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Game Info:

Batman: The Enemy Within
Developed by: Telltale Games
Published by: Telltale Games
Release date: August 8, 2017
Available on: Android, iOS, PS4, Xbox One, Windows
Genre: Adventure
Number of players: Single-player
ESRB Rating: Mature for violence, blood and gore, mild language
Price: $24.99 (season pass)
(Humble Store Link)

Thank you Telltale Games for sending us a review code for this series!

Batman: The Enemy Within takes place shortly after the previous Telltale Batman series. Bruce Wayne is atoning for his father’s crimes and is no longer the public face of Wayne Enterprises. The company has been doing well since he was forced to step down as CEO. Alfred still has trauma from his recent kidnapping by Lady Arkham, but he won’t let that get in the way of aiding Bruce/Batman any way he can.

The enemies from the previous series are pretty quiet in this one. Lady Arkham is presumed dead, yet her body was never located. Harvey Dent was taken away by GCPD and is either in jail or in a mental institution for his crimes. John Doe/The Joker awkwardly appears at a funeral and depending on Bruce’s decisions he can be friendly or upset with him. John Doe and Bruce share a common foe, The Riddler.

Batman: The Enemy Within
Highlights:

Strong Points: Great story; tough decisions
Weak Points: Lots of quick time events if you’re not a fan of them
Moral Warnings: Extreme violence, blood, and gore; gambling; language and blaspheming

True to his name, The Riddler demands answers to riddles in exchange for a chance to survive. One of his riddles is “What question can you never answer yes to?” The answer is "Are you dead?". His methods are cruel and often deadly if answered too slowly or incorrectly. Like the previous series, blood and gore is plentiful in this title. The Riddler likes to use torture/death chambers to trap his targets in until he gets the answers he seeks. In the beginning of this episode, a crime boss is in one of these chambers and takes too long to respond and you get to watch a saw blade remove the tips of a couple of his fingers. Many people get shot and one guy gets his throat cut open. Fortunately, not everyone dies as some people only get tased.

Lives of people will depend on the decisions that Bruce/Batman makes. Because of some choices I made I spared the lives of some agents while causing deafness in another. Not all of the decisions are tough ones though. Besides being able to chose Batman’s gadget color, you can also select the music he listens to while working in the Batcave. I chose classical over ambient or jazz.

Batman: The Enemy Within
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 92%
Gameplay - 18/20
Graphics - 9/10
Sound - 9/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 62%
Violence - 0/10
Language - 1/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - -10/10

I like how you can have Bruce tell the truth or lie to people. I often went the truthful route and actually made some people angry by being honest. Besides lying you’ll see some gambling, smoking, and drinking throughout the game. Gotham is a pretty dangerous town but lung cancer may kill Commissioner Gordon before a bullet does. Foul language is also prevalent in this game and some characters don’t hesitate in taking the Lord’s name in vain. I’ve already covered the violence earlier in this review and because of the gore alone, this game should not be played by or near young children.

The background music, sound effects, and voice acting are all top notch as usual with Telltale’s games. Visually, this series is very similar to the previous one and it ran great on my GTX1070 powered laptop. The previous installment had performance issues which I have not experienced in this one.

Overall, this series is off to a great start and I look forward to the next four episodes. If you don’t mind the moral issues in this series or the previous one, I recommend checking it out. Because of the gruesome violence, please don’t play this game around kids. As an adult I cringed several times.

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Game Info:

Sudden Strike 4
Developer: Kite Games
Published by: Kalypso Media Digital
Release Date: Aug 11, 2017
Available on: Windows, Linux, macOS, PS4
Genre: Real Time Strategy
Players: 1-8
ESRB Rating: T for Teen for Blood, Language, Mild Sexual Themes, Violence
Price: $49.99
(Humble Store Link)

Thank you Kalypso Media for sending us this game to review!

In Sudden Strike 4 you take command of German, Soviet or Allied forces as you fight your way through historical battles in World War 2. The game is a top down classic style real time strategy game where you capture bases to generate resources to call in troops. You either win by completing objectives in the campaign mode or you capture enough bases so your opponent cannot generate any new troops. Each faction can choose between one of three real life generals. The general you choose focuses there abilities on either infantry, armored units or support units. Aside from the campaign you can challenge other players in multiplayer skirmishes or you can face the AI.

The basics are done well in Sudden Strike. You can separate your units by squad and you can hotkey them to different number buttons on your keyboard. This allows you to make custom squadrons for your needs. Some of the small attentions to detail are nice as well; I enjoy that the different faction units speak different languages. Even the general’s skills and passives add somewhat to the realism of commanding real armies. You don't have abilities that boost your resource production rate or skills that increase the speed of your tanks to unreasonable levels. This is a "plan and think" kind of RTS. You won't win by simply rushing infantry soldiers into your enemies constantly. The Campaign mode is well built, the narration is simple and gets you into the action right away. It even gives you historical context behind the battles and victories.

Sudden Strike 4
Highlights:

Strong Points: It's a strong tactical RTS; you'll be able to learn clever positioning and timing to beat your opponent. The single player campaign is well built, you'll get a lot of gameplay hours out of it. 
Weak Points: The multiplayer maps are small, without the ability to place your own bases, you lose out on some tactical aspects of modern RTS games.
Moral Warnings: War never changes folks, it's a war game with historical accuracy in the campaign. The violence is tame but noticeable in a war where you're sending hundreds off to die for you in a mad push to capture a base.

When you get to more advanced design the gameplay decisions are questionable to say the least. The maps you can choose for the skirmish mode are extremely small. Even with the slow movement speed, it might be possible in some instances to rush down opponents. You can't build spawning stations or other bases anywhere; you're restricted to what the maps already have placed which cuts some of the strategic value from a typical RTS. This can further amplify the issue of rushing. All it will take is one smart cookie to figure out the optimal common path for units to take to capture a base faster than their opponent. If you don't want to play against other human players the skirmish A.I is a competent opponent at varying difficulties.

While it's true that each army has one of three different generals to choose from, they are still all the same. Nothing separates the tanks gameplay wise, only in visual design. All the vehicles move the same speed and shoot the same distance. There is no major gameplay difference between the units to help you decide which faction you want to play. If you're playing a support doctrine general vs another support doctrine general you're in a mirror match even if one's German and one is Soviet. If your opponent is infantry focused and you're still that support general, sure his infantry might get ten percent more health but there's not that much difference between you two to say you're vastly different from each other.

Graphics and sound are average for this game. The environments are nice and you can destroy particular paths to set up ambushes or to have your units directly charge in at opponents. The music is nice yet it's nothing memorable or worth a special note. The campaign maps are usually just bombed out fields and destroyed buildings.

Sudden Strike 4
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 76%
Gameplay - 14/20
Graphics - 7/10
Sound - 7/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 90%
Violence - 7/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

On morality, since you don't even follow particular soldiers or see into the deeper aspect of war you don't have anything psychologically to deal with or any bad or poor language. Violence is there but it's tame; the tanks blow up when they lose their health, and when infantry die they fall down and stop moving. You don't have extreme dismemberment even if a human takes a tank shell to the face. As for mild sexual themes, there is some dialogue about flirting with a girl back home but nothing perverted. As with most soldiers expect some cuss words and rough language in the dialogue as well.

At the end of the day Sudden Strike 4 is worth it; it's a decently designed introductory RTS game with a solid campaign mode. The multiplayer may not be strong but the campaign has a reasonable amount of content. Be an armchair general with Sudden Strike 4.

A quick side note for long time gamers who focus on RTS games. I am very well aware of the controversy surrounding Sudden Strike 4 yet I don't feel it's relevant or big enough to affect my review. Take this review as an experience from a person new to a series with a semi-competitive knowledge on RTS games only.

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Game Info:

Woodle Tree 2: Worlds
Developed by: Fabio Ferrara
Published by: Chubby Pixel
Release date: September 16, 2016
Available on: Windows, macOS, Linux
Genre: Open World Platformer
Number of players: 1-4 (local or online co-op)
Price: $3.99

Thank you, Chubby Pixel, for sending us a review key!

When a dark force sucks the life and water from the trees in the center of the Wood Lands, a sentient tree stump must become a hero. Alone or with friends, the player guides the stump from snow-capped mountains to sandy islands, from the desert to the lagoon. With little more than a leaf and a double jump, the stump collects small drops of water scattered throughout the game's eight zones. This is not a technically impressive game, nor an especially long one. Nevertheless, for all its simplicity (and, in many cases, thanks to it), Woodle Tree 2: Worlds provides one of the most kid-friendly 3D platforming experiences available.

Since an open world is a major change from Woodle Tree Adventures, let's start there. The central hub at which the player begins is laid out like the spokes of a wheel, eight trees pointing the directions to different game areas in all corners of the map. In addition to the zones listed above, there are forests, caves, a mountaintop town, canyons, and hills. The world is truly open to exploration, and there are pleasant meadows, rivers, and animal villages wherever the player wanders. Only loading divides the different areas. Frequently there are dark zones overrun with black goo and enemies. Sometimes these protect cosmetic unlockables. Unfortunately, as with the rest of the game world, other times they protect absolutely nothing. The fun flora and fauna of the world make for a nice walk to the main areas, but there is little reason to stay and the graphics do not give much to gawk at. On the other hand, the game shows an impressive amount of distance. After clearing the mountaintop village, I glided off the highest point I could. As I floated back to the center hub, I could see well into several other zones. It was a good view.

Woodle Tree 2: Worlds
Highlights:

Strong Points: Varied terrain means varied platforming; the core gameplay of jumping and gliding scales well to player ability
Weak Points: Repetitive and bland graphical textures; imprecise combat hinders rather than compliments platforming; camera angle is too restricted; much of the world feels empty
Moral Warnings: Your character shrinks and disappears if it takes too much damage

The play areas are colored as well as the plain graphical assets allow. They are more subtly distinguished once you start jumping around. At one end of the map you have to navigate ledges carefully to activate the wooden platform equivalent of a ski lift. Elsewhere you have to dive underwater to find a well-hidden water drop. Trampoline mushrooms, booster flowers, and updrafts lend more variety. These little changes in play mix up the whole experience. The level design consistently and pleasantly surprised me.

The game often uses yellow brick roads to guide the players who might be too young to appreciate that reference. Collectable berries trace walking and jumping paths. In addition, water drops in your current zone are visible as far as the map can render at once. Combined with the already-impressive draw distance, this ensures that, if you take a look around, you can find a water drop on the horizon and start heading for it. The player will get lost from time to time, and the game will bring him back to the right path. All in all, it is easy to move around the map.

The basic mechanics are forgiving of inexperienced players. The leaf your stump carries is used to carry water, swat switches or enemies, and glide. This last mechanic provides an unlimited slowed fall, letting the player recover from missed jumps. The water and switches grow/raise platforms and open bridges. Combined with the open world, jumping's versatility furnishes multiple paths through the game world. A cautious player might hop and dodge to a switch in order to lower a door, and a more experienced player might time jumps to avoid the door completely. The freedom to approach gaps and blocks from multiple angles kept the game fresh for me, well outside of the target audience. The game lends itself to casual speedrunning. Intentionally or not, it rewards precise play with shortcuts and risk.

Woodle Tree 2: Worlds
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 70%
Gameplay - 14/20
Graphics - 6/10
Sound - 8/10
Stability - 3/5
Controls - 4/5

Morality Score - 98%
Violence - 9/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

Various animals, friend and enemy, wander the landscape. Dark dots and other creatures serve as the primary enemies. They usually send the player back to a checkpoint after one or two hits--the same number of leaf whacks needed to turn most of them into puffs of smoke. This is the only potential moral concern; games do not get much more family-friendly than Woodle Tree 2. Combat is cumbersome because it is difficult to aim the leaf. The camera does not help matters; it stays close to the player avatar at all times and cannot be panned far up or down. In a move unforgivable in every 3D game since Ocarina of Time, there is no button to reorient the camera behind the character. You usually have plenty of time to move the camera; it's those times that you don't that enemies will be able to reach you.

The visuals are bland, and the sound is only slightly less so. The collectible masks and leafs are fun while adding little to the experience. The occasional loading or clipping glitch crashed the game. These hiccups ended play sessions and didn't detract from the game much. I did not get to try co-op; however, I feel confident saying that the level design does not encourage multiplayer play. I suspect that after a second player helps you hit a switch to activate a platform, he would just be dead weight who has to wait for the sliding platform to come back down so he can take it up. There is no intrinsic reason to bring along friends for the adventure.

I enjoyed Woodle Tree 2: Worlds much more than I expected to. The plain world is fun to bounce around in, and the levels are well-constructed. For every time the world disappointed me with an empty dead end, it surprised me with a secret area or interesting new concept. Would I recommend buying it? Probably not for yourself if you are old enough to be reading this review. At the same time, if you buy this game for a youngster who, for one reason or another, doesn't engage with it, try it out yourself. This soothing game might bring a smile to your face.

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Game Info:

Worms W.M.D
Developed By: Team17 Digital Ltd
Published By: Team17 Digital Ltd
Released: Aug 23, 2016
Available On: Microsoft Windows, macOS, Linux, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Genre: Action, Strategy
ESRB Rating: E 10+ (Cartoon Violence, Crude Humor, Language)
Number of Players: Single player with local and online multiplayer
MSRP: $29.99
(Humble Store Link)

Thank you Team 17 for sending us this game to review.

Worms W.M.D is the latest installment of the 22 year old Worms series. It has been a mainstay in PC gaming since the late '90s. Instead of iterating on a long running series they decided to simplify things and return to the Worms Armageddon format. This is a classic worms game where you control a team of subterranean soldiers to do battle across creative 2D maps. All of the classic weapons and environmental hazards are there and new vehicles are added. There's a crafting system that's been added so you can craft weapons on another player's turn. Although a story mode is lacking there are plenty of missions and challenges to blast your way through.

The graphics and artstyle remain as they have always been. The cartoony worms are bright and expressive. The maps and backgrounds are colorful and creative. There's a big variety in the types of maps and themes. You can even customize your maps and import pictures into the backgrounds. Upbeat music, whimsical explosions, and grunting worms are all present. The voice acting is limited to one liners due to the lack of story mode, but there's an impressive number of sets that you can unlock from playing the game.

One new feature in this game is that you can now go inside buildings and collect materials for crafting. When inside a building, you see the inside. When outside a building, you see the outside. Even if another player damages one of your worms hiding in a building you'll only see the damage numbers pop up.

Worms W.M.D.
Highlights:

Strong Points: Iconic strategic gameplay; Vehicles; Able to craft weapons
Weak Points: Lack of story mode; AI turns take too long
Moral Warnings: Foul language; Weapons used by player; Christian imagery used for violence

There's a lot of single player content in the game. The campaign mode and challenges offer a good number of missions, each with additional objectives and achievements. There's also tutorials and advanced tutorials to really test your mastery of a specific weapon. Let's not forget custom games to play with other people or AI. I don't know if they were trying to make the AI more like a human player or what but the AI controlled worms will take their sweet time before moving to their location, awkwardly targeting, and then snapping into perfect position to hit you from across the map.

The biggest addition to this game is the crafting system. Here you can scrounge the map for materials (or get them in supply drops) and then craft any weapon you have materials for. You can craft during your enemy's turn, which is great because I found AI turns to take entirely too long. Along with crafting the standard weapons, you can also craft variants of weapons. The game shows you this feature exists and then moves on but, once I actually delved into the weapon variants I was impressed. There are a lot of fun killing machines to be created in there.

Vehicles were also added to the game and I absolutely love them. They add a great dimension to the game and are just fun to control. Their high power is balanced by the fact that someone can jump in and steal it after your turn is over. The Mech and Helicopter are my favorites; they can both fly and have powerful weapons.

Worms W.M.D.
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 84%
Gameplay - 17/20
Graphics - 9/10
Sound - 7/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 4/5

Morality Score - 81%
Violence - 7/10
Language - 5/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8.5/10

The online play is both functional and active. Both of those traits together are somewhat rare for a year old, niche game. At the time of writing I was able to join a few 4-player games rather quickly and I got thoroughly annihilated. The vehicles really add a lot to this as well. I thought that matches would devolve into swapping vehicles back and forth but that doesn't really happen as people tend to move the vehicles to remote locations. Also the people I played against were incredibly accurate with the bazooka.

Worms W.M.D, like the previous games in the series, are extremely violent games wrapped up in a cute, cartoony veneer. There's no blood or gore but when worms run out of health they commit suicide, usually by explosion, and leave a gravestone. Some of the one-liners that the worms spout contain foul language and sexual humor. One of the weapons is the holy hand grenade, which is a yellow and white grenade with a cross on it. It's meant as a reference to a Monty Python sketch, but it's still a Christian symbol used for killing.

Worms W.M.D is an excellent return to form for the series. It's clear that Team 17 listened to their fans and went back to a classic entry. While I'm happy they chose this route, I just wish they hadn't jettisoned a story mode and more involved voice acting along the way. The additions of crafting and vehicles really add to the overall gameplay. If you like classic Worms games from the start of the series, you'll love this title.

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Game Info:

Subterrain
Developed By: Pixellore
Published By: Pixellore
Released: January 21, 2016
Available On: Playstation 4, Windows, Xbox One
Genre: Top-down shooter/survival
ESRB Rating: M for Mature – Violence, Blood and Gore, Language
Number of Players: 1
Price: $16.99
(Humble Store Link)

*Advertising disclosure* Though Black Shell Media was a former advertising partner, this review is not influenced by that relationship.

Thanks to Black Shell Media for the review key!

Though entertainment is and should be the primary goal of all video games, they can be educational as well. Most run the gamut from transparent Sesame Street shovelware to irreverent Typing of the Dead-esque romps, but a few can teach you practical life lessons as well. In Subterrain’s case, it reinforces a message learned from Doom: don’t build a research base on Mars, lest you get overrun by monsters.

Subterrain puts you in the shoes of Dr. Albert West, who comes to the Mars colony MPO to develop a cure for his wife’s Alzheimer’s disease. After a lab accident results in the death of a test subject, West is thrown in jail for murder, where he stays until a prisoner transfer gets cut short by a sudden loss of power. As food, water, and emergency power wanes, West escapes his cell from the air duct to find that, while he may be the only one living on MPO, he’s certainly not the only one that’s ambulatory.

As a top-down shooter, Subterrain has you wandering the various sections of MPO in search of supplies to escape Mars; as a survival game, you’ll have to take West’s hunger, thirst, fatigue, bodily injuries, infection level, and bowel movements under consideration while you do so. MPO is littered with random objects that can be repurposed for raw materials, which are then used to create items to keep West alive and the station’s reactor powered up. Nearly everything is researchable and upgradable using MPO’s built-in facilities and 3D printers, and you’ll get better backpacks, guns, reactor cores, health kits, and more as you progress. Your capacity for creation is limited by your materials and your machines’ software – this becomes the basis for leaving your safe zone at Central Control and prowling the infected halls.

Subterrain
Highlights:

Strong Points: Many gameplay features that work well together; lots of helpful details and quality-of-life additions
Weak Points: Repetitive and overstays its welcome; mediocre music; some framerate drops, vanishing items, and audio glitches
Moral Warnings: Violence, blood, gore, and disturbing imagery; drug and alcohol use; some mild swearing

It’s certainly a lot to juggle, but to its credit, Subterrain pulls it off. At first, your progress is hampered by the small size of your backpack – each type of pack has both quantity and weight limits – as well as your oxygen, thermal, and power packs – every zone outside of Central Control has broken filters you need to find and replace, and your flashlight and ranged weapons stop working when your power pack runs out of juice. As you fill up on items and run low on air, you’ll have to head back home, where you can dump your goodies, make new items, and set out again for longer periods of time. As time passes, however, the various sections of MPO become more and more contaminated, resulting in ever-increasing strength and numbers of virus-spawned enemies, who can and will mount attacks on your home base. It all results in a steady power progression for both West and the infection – you’re always getting stronger, but the challenge still progressively rises. If that challenge proves too much or too little, there are four well-documented difficulty options as well as an optional permadeath setting, though you can’t change these in-game.

Even so, there’s not much variation to the overall gameplay once you settle in. There are fifteen zones outside of Central Control, and all follow the same script: find a data chip or two for your software upgrades, replace the filters, scavenge items, kill mutants, repeat. You’ll have a general knowledge of where to go through journal entries you find laying around, but outside of that you’ll comb the procedurally generated, similar-looking halls for the same objects in every location. The later locations have eleven floors each, with the thermal regulator always located on the final level, so you’ll have to visit each and every area of each and every zone before you’re done. It’s repetitive, lengthy, and nearly soul-crushing near the end, as you’re treated to a fake-out ending and given a new goal to upgrade the filters in every area, now with even stronger and more numerous enemies in your path. If you still have unexplored floors at that point, you’re in for a rough time.

It’s not all doom and gloom, however; Subterrain is well detailed and full of little quality-of-life additions to help out. The journal entries, while worth reading for the main plot and interesting side stories they convey, have important text highlighted in yellow. West will announce when he’s getting tired, hungry, low on oxygen, and whatnot; though it might seem silly to state that he needs a drink when he’s neck-deep in monsters, it’s certainly helpful. Each of the four general types of creatures have their own sound effects you can hear through doors, and the background music changes dynamically depending on how infected the floor you’re on currently is. Areas of high infection will also take on a grimy bluish filter that will dissipate as you eliminate monsters. All this helps temper the amount of menu-checking busywork you have to do, and makes the ride at least relatively smooth throughout.

Subterrain
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 78%
Gameplay - 16/20
Graphics - 8/10
Sound - 6/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 79%
Violence - 2/10
Language - 7.5/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

Subterrain’s graphics and art style play well together, even with its rather muted color scheme. Most everything is recognizable at a glance, though it’s occasionally hard to tell drawers and chairs apart. Weapons and armor change appearance with each upgrade, and the aforementioned corruption effect is a nice touch. The sound effects are equally well done: guns of varying levels sound appropriately powerful, and the hum of machinery and the strange noises of the monsters set a fitting tone. West has a few voiceovers, and his acting is a bit disinterested but of decent quality nonetheless. The music, however, is less effective: as it’s tied to the number of creatures in the area, you’ll hear the same generic bass-filled ambient song for a large portion of the first half of the game. It’ll soon get replaced by the “highly infected” tune, which is loud and chaotic to the point of annoyance. With the number of hours you’ll need to put into this game to finish it, you’ll quickly grow tired of the game’s limited soundtrack.

While generally rare, Subterrain has a few bugs that need pointing out. Perhaps due to the scope of the game, little framerate hiccups can occur, but never for more than a second. The audio has a tendency to glitch out in the final areas and boss fights, likely caused by reloading after death. The most egregious bug, however, has to do with your item shortcuts: each type of armor gives you one to six item slots you can activate with the relevant number keys, but sometimes replacing a slotted item with another will cause the former to vanish entirely. It only happened three or four times through the game, but it’s still annoying to have your supply of health kits vanish into thin air deep in infected territory.

As expected from a shooter, violence is plentiful. Your enemies disintegrate on death, but shotguns and grenades will blow them apart beforehand. The ground will usually be bloody, and there is no shortage of mutilated human corpses to find. The monsters aren’t technically undead but do have a lot of zombie-like characteristics, and the infection in general makes for some grotesque imagery. While it's for survival rather than recreation, West can drink beer to quench his thirst, and use three different drugs to enhance his abilities for a short time; these are optional for the most part, though the final bosses might be impossible without the use of the speed-increasing drug. There is some swearing, though surprisingly light considering the setting – it’s limited to uncommon uses of “hell” and God’s name in vain. West does use some crude, though not particularly vulgar, language to indicate when he needs to go to the bathroom, but as a cultured man of science, he won't relieve himself anywhere but a toilet even as the last man standing in an apocalypse. The game also blurs West out when he's doing his duty, but he pretty clearly keeps his armor on. Subterrain’s ESRB rating started as Teen but was increased to Mature shortly after launch; the latter designation is much more fitting.

In the end, Subterrain is a well-crafted game that happens to overstay its welcome. The various parts fit together well, but it’s ultimately a game with little variety. Fans of the survival genre, however, will likely find a large, satisfying experience with a more than fair price tag; there’s no denying the game is good at what it does. He may not be Doomguy, but Dr. West can rip and tear with the best of them.

-Cadogan

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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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