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Game Info:

Spellbind
Developed by: Spider Key Games
Published by: Spider Key Games
Released: March 4, 2016
Available on: Windows, Mac
Genre: Puzzle, Adventure
Number of players: 1
Price: $2.99

Thank you, Black Shell Media, for providing a copy of this game to review!

In the small town of Riathon, 16-year-old Luppe runs the largest gang of thieves. His rival challenges him to sneak into the home of Lord Amatar to steal the most expensive bottle of wine in the cellar. The task shouldn't be a problem for the self-proclaimed king of thieves, but Luppe finds more than he expected in the seemingly abandoned mansion.

That's the backstory of the game "Spellbind" from Spider Key Games. You play Luppe in his adventure through the "creepy," seemingly abandoned mansion. The game consists of a series of still scenes, with navigation done by clicking on the edges of the screen. Likewise, you interact with objects on the screen simply by pointing and clicking. Right-click to open your inventory to use items or cast spells. Travel through the house – or through a magical diary – and solve the 12 different puzzles in order to find out what happened to Lord Amatar and escape the house.

Spellbind
Highlights:

Strong Points: Entertaining puzzles; low price
Weak Points: Short game; primitive graphics; mediocre storyline; little replay value
Moral Warnings: Minor language; some blood; demonic references; main character is a thief

The controls are as familiar as the scenario. The game seems influenced by similar predecessors, such as the Labyrinth of Time, Myst or the 7th Guest. Unlike those classics, though, Spellbind suffers from low-quality graphics and short gameplay.

Even though the game was put together in Unity, the scenes look more like individual pictures pasted together in Photoshop. I'm not sure if this is an attempt to be "retro," but the end result comes out as more amateurish rather than stylish. In addition, after completing all the puzzles and getting into the ending, the art shifts into an 8-bit style that ends up feeling like a completely different game. In this portion, you have to answer a series of questions that will determine which of the three game endings you will receive. Your actions with the puzzles have no bearing on the ending you receive, either.

The music is all right, but a bit repetitive. Sound effects are minimal, and there is no voice acting in the game whatsoever. The strengths of the game lies in the puzzles. There is a nice variety to the puzzles, including a word search and a shifting tile game. Three of the puzzles, however, can be solved quite rapidly simply by trying different combinations in a systematic approach until the correct solution is found (oddly enough, each of these puzzles also have clues hidden nearby that provide the answers). This only takes a few moments, since there are few combinations available. Also, there are only 12 puzzles in the game. You can choose to solve them all, or skip the ones you don't want to complete. You can skip all of them, if you wish, and there's even a Steam achievements for doing so. For 100% completion you will have to play through the game twice. Given that the answers to the puzzles don't change, this doesn't take too much time – I've finished the game in four hours, and that includes the time I left the computer sitting while taking care of household chores. 

Spellbind
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 56%
Gameplay - 10/20
Graphics - 4/10
Sound - 5/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 76%
Violence - 4/10
Language - 8/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 8/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

There was one spot during my second playthrough where the game froze. I had to force-quit out of the game, and when I returned it had left me off at the start of one of the previous puzzles. A minor irritation, but still a sign that the game isn't completely bug-free. There also are a few typos that occur in the course of the game as well, but not ones that affect gameplay, at least.

A few minor factors arise in terms of morality. The biggest issue, of course, is that you're playing a thief, wandering around a house that doesn't belong to him. Although he doesn't steal much in the game, he revels in his abilities to escape from prisons and stealing things. There are a few instances of blood, including one scene where a spider-like creature actually kills Luppe. There are two vulgarities in the game – h*ll and d*mn – but each word only appears once. Finally, there are references to a demon and demonic possession once you get into the ending portions of the game.

The strongest things about the game are the puzzles (which don't provide much of a challenge, really), and the low price of $2.99. But the simplistic graphics, short gameplay and mediocre story line don't serve as much of an incentive to purchase the game in the first place. Puzzle fans might get a bit of enjoyment in the game, but those looking for a harder challenge or a more in-depth experience may want to pass.

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Game Info:

CLANNAD Side Stories
Developed By: VisualArts/Key
Published By: Sekai Project
Release Date: June 2, 2016
Available On: Windows
ESRB Rating: N/A
Genre: Visual Novel
Mode: Single Player
MSRP: $19.99

Thank you Sekai Project for sending us this game to review!

CLANNAD Side Stories is a relatively short set of additional stories that expands on what CLANNAD already showed you.  Several stories take place during the high school arc, with others taking place in other side arcs, and a few canonical ones also.  It’s a nice set of stories for those who have already played CLANNAD and are looking for more.

Half of the stories take place before the story of CLANNAD.  They help set up background information to help you get to know the characters better.  With one exception (I’m not a fan of the first story), they are all wonderful.  After all, who wouldn’t love a story told from the perspective of a baby boar?

CLANNAD Side Stories
Highlights:

Strong Points: If you love CLANNAD, there are more stories here, and almost all original ones; voice for Tomoya; new sound effects; widescreen; nice art
Weak Points: Kind of short (6-7 hours); no gameplay choices (it’s more like a DVD with a menu); no choice to manually forward or skip text, and no scrollback (if you miss a line, you need to restart the chapter); no way to save progress; no controller support
Moral Warnings: Spirituality similar to CLANNAD (town spirits) and a character is summoned by saying her name; fortune telling (with playing cards); magic spells cast using a spellbook; words like ‘h*ll’ and ‘t*ts’ used; alcohol is consumed by main character and father in law (legally); some jokes include innuendo with some homosexual; dirty books mentioned; phrases ‘bumping uglies’ and ‘grow a pair’ used; a couple of different bath scenes, where females are shown undressed, with steam covering the necessary parts; silly ‘girl talk’ comparing breast sizes; a ‘pretty’ guy is confused for a girl; an angry girl is accused of being on her period

 

 

 

 

The other stories take place during or after the main scenario of CLANNAD.  I really liked these; some were very funny, and a few were really touching.  It was also really nice to see a story that takes place after the true ending in CLANNAD After Story.  I felt like the final ending in that novel was a bit short, and this expands on it in a nice, heartwarming way.  It is good to see how the main character Tomoya has grown, also.

On a technical level, the visual novel engine is improved, with nicer, widescreen graphics, and sound effects that corroborate what is happening on screen and in the text.  The character art is slightly different, and mostly for the better.  Tomoya is voiced for the first time, which is a nice touch.  There are some really nice still shots that appear to be hand drawn, and look great.  The music is pretty much the same as the base game, not that it’s a bad thing.

While the game looks better, I was disappointed to find that you have no control over the progress at all.  Voices and text automatically continue with no input. You can’t save, and once you start a story, it simply continues at its own pace until it completes.  Honestly, this could easily have been a DVD with a menu – that’s exactly what it plays like.  The only difference is you can access a menu to pause or quit – which you can also do with DVDs.  You don’t even get an icon saying what you already played.  Despite that, it’s not the end of the world, as each episode is about twenty to thirty minutes, so it’s not too hard to get through them.

Like CLANNAD, there are some appropriateness issues to be aware of.  There is actually less language, as I only noted ‘h*ll’ and ‘t*ts’ as far as individual words go.  There is still present the spirituality issues, like the town spirits, and magic spells out of a spellbook.  Alcohol is consumed by both the main character and his father-in-law, but they are both of legal age.  The phrases ‘bumping uglies’ and ‘grow a pair’ are used.

CLANNAD Side Stories
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 86%
Gameplay - 16/20
Graphics - 9/10
Sound - 10/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 4/5

Morality Score - 76%
Violence - 10/10
Language - 5/10
Sexual Content - 6/10
Occult/Supernatural - 7/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7/10

 

The sexual content as described isn’t much different than CLANNAD, though there is a bit more visually.  Like CLANNAD, there is occasional perverted or suggestive talk, mentions of dirty books, and ‘girl talk’ about breasts.  (There's 'guy talk' and fantasizing about them, too.)  There is a scene with shopping in a lingerie store. Also, it appears that a girl wants her much older sister to be in love with her, but it’s hard to tell if it is serious because of the character saying it.  

Unlike CLANNAD, there are a couple of visual things that are inappropriate.  There are two bath scenes that are drawn.  Naturally the important parts are covered by steam or other things, but you can see girls in each scene (there is a male one also) and breasts are visible either from behind, or frontally at an angle, with steam covering them up as needed.

CLANNAD Side Stories is a nice companion to CLANNAD for fans of the series.  There are sixteen mini episodes, each focusing on a different character, and all of them (except maybe one) are enjoyable.  Having seen them, I would recommend playing them in the order listed in the game.  Do not watch the last three out of order.  Of course, please consider appropriateness issues from the start; other than the two bath scenes, they are nothing out of the ordinary for existing fans of CLANNAD.  Given the length, waiting for a sale does seem reasonable.

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Game Info:

Time Mysteries: Inheritance - Remastered
Developed by: Artifex Mundi
Published by: Artifex Mundi
Released: October 6, 2014
Available on: Amazon Kindle, Android, BlackBerry, iOS, Mac OS X, Windows, Windows Phone
Genre: Puzzle / hidden object
Number of players: 1
Price: $9.99 (Steam), $4.99 (Full version – Amazon, Google Play), $3.99 (full version – iOS), Free demo for portable devices

Hidden object games have been around for almost as long as I can remember. One particular franchise I remember was called "I Spy," and are books that my nieces, nephews and my own children have enjoyed. It should come as little surprise that the simple concept also has made its way into video game formats. Among those that have made a name for themselves, Artifex Mundi is one of the preeminent successes, with games that provide interesting challenges, intriguing storylines and a wonderful delivery system.

Unfortunately, this game is not one of them.

The game focuses on hidden object-type puzzles. Basically, the bulk of the game shows you a scene and a list of objects you need to discover, like an umbrella or three acorns. When you find all the objects you can move on with the story. If you don't like playing hidden object games you can play an alternative, match-three style game instead. Interspersed between the hidden object puzzles are other games, such as "find the difference" challenges or jigsaw puzzle brain-teasers.

Time Mysteries: Inheritance - Remastered
Highlights:

Strong Points: Nice variety of puzzles
Weak Points: Hideous animations; poor voice acting; dull plot
Moral Warnings: Possible magic use; minor occult references; implied violence

Although the graphics are passable for these, the animation between the puzzles is pretty bad – and delve into hideous territory for those instances where characters speak. The faces almost appear as if they were pasted onto Silly Putty, and are stretched and squished to give the illusion of movement. The voice acting is sub-par as well, with some of the lines delivered without enthusiasm, and others excessively hammy. The storyline is somewhat nonsensical, too – for some reason, the main character needs to collect seven different rings, scattered through time, in order to find her father. With the help of a shattered crystal ball – unoriginally named "Ball" - she uses the time travel technology to meet with an assortment of other people, all of whom require her to solve various puzzles before telling her anything useful. 

In the puzzles themselves, some of the hidden object games have an odd lighting element where the screen flickers as if the scene is illuminated by a poorly-wired fluorescent light. This doesn't occur with all the hidden object games, so this is intentional. Some of the hidden objects are poorly hidden as well, with shadows or pixellated edges that make them stand out easily against the background. Other than that, the puzzles are entertaining, if oddly placed. There is a nice variety of challenges, and it's possible to skip them after waiting a short time, if the player is so inclined. However, the puzzles each only have one solution, so once you've completed them, there isn't much reason to play the game again.

 

Time Mysteries: Inheritance - Remastered
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 60%
Gameplay - 11/20
Graphics - 4/10
Sound - 5/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 92%
Violence - 9/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 7/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

On the moral front, there isn't too much to be concerned about. There is some implied violence at the beginning, but nothing that is really shown. The rings are possibly magic, but Ball gives the impression that it is actually a technology that is advanced far beyond the understanding of our modern-day intelligence. There are instances of Ouija boards, tarot cards and a séance as well – although the latter is proven to be a hoax thanks to a hidden room. There are a few instances of pentagrams as small background elements, and a pentagram-like shape is manipulated in a couple of the later puzzles. Finally, in one challenge you need to assist a witch with a magic spell, although again it's vague as to if this is really magic, or simply advanced technology.

If going by the puzzles alone, it's easy to see why Artifex Mundi has made such a reputation for themselves in this genre. Coupled with the story and the hideous animations, though, it's sheer luck that it even got off the ground. Fortunately, their later games are presented much better. Time Mysteries: Inheritance is one of their first games (released in 2010), and it shows. It's disappointing that, with this "remastered version," that they didn't clean up their earlier mistakes and make this game look like their later installments. The portable versions have a free demo available, so it's good to try before you buy. But if you're looking for an entertaining hidden object / puzzle game, it might be best to pass on this one.

 

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Game Info:

Tyto Ecology
Developed by: Immersed Games
Published by: Immersed Games
Release date: April 14, 2016
Available on: PC, Mac, Linux
Genre: Simulation
ESRB Rating: Not rated
Price: $6.99 without the Himalayas DLC, $9.99 with it

Thank you Immersed Games for sending us this game to review!

Tyto Ecology is a 3D ecology simulation game where you have several biomes to choose from and balance with producers, consumers, and decomposers.  There are over seventy plants and animals to scatter and keep alive in your territories.

No matter which biome you start off with, the objective remains to same: to populate and maintain life in the zones that you’re in charge of. The default biomes include the Amazon Rainforest, the Mojave Desert, and the Great Plains.  At first you’ll only have access to one zone and you can unlock the remaining three with in-game currency.  The Tyto coins are earned weekly by keeping a diverse amount of plants and animals alive and well.  There are various achievements and each of them awards you with bonus coins and energy.  The energy regenerates over time and is required for placing any type of plant or animal in the biome.

Tyto Ecology
Highlights:

Strong Points: Great way to teach people the circle of life and the importance of each species for the survival of others; some of the DLC proceeds goes towards the World Wildlife fund 
Weak Points: Have to pay with in-game currency to speed up the game significantly
Moral Warnings: Insects and animals can die if not properly cared for

At first the number of plants, insects, and animals are limited, but you can unlock more with Tyto coins.  The last purpose of Tyto coins is to speed up time by a week, a month or three months in advance.  This is the ultimate test of your biome’s sustainability.  While the cost of fast forwarding time is steep, you regain most of it, if not moreso for having a healthy biome.

There’s a wide variety biomes and each of them has unique species of plants and animals to choose from.  There are many that are the same throughout all of them too.  Moths are found in all of the biomes and are a food source for frogs and can pollinate plants.  Before you can place herbivores you have to have enough vegetation for them to eat and enough pollinators to keep the plants blooming.  Plants, along with any other animal with a lacking food supply, will perish if their needs are not met.  Fortunately, you’ll be alerted if any animals are starving or if their population is decreasing. 

If there is too much death in the habitat, mushrooms, millipedes, or earthworms can make the environment healthy again.  Many of the habitats have streams and waterways that support fish life.  Make sure that the streams are fully stocked to keep the carnivores and omnivores happy.  The fish are easier to replenish than herbivores.  

Tyto Ecology
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 76%
Gameplay - 14/20
Graphics - 7/10
Sound - 8/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 98%
Violence - 9/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

If the needs of the animals are met, they will reproduce and flourish.  The mating process is not seen as babies literally fall from the sky.  The hunting process is shown, but blood is not seen.  Other than the natural violence, this game is safe for people of all ages who are fascinated with or want to learn more about biology.

Visually speaking, the environments are as pretty as you make them.  Energy permitting, you can place many flowers and huge trees to beautify the biomes.  The animal models are fairly detailed and are well animated.  Their sound effects are pretty good too.

My biggest complaint is the pacing in this game.  You can speed it up slightly, but it’s never enough.  This is a common enough compaint that the developers have listened and there is an update in the works to address this issue.  I tried running the Steam beta, but it failed to launch so I cannot comment on the changes.  It’s great to see them listening to the players and making this educational title more enjoyable.  If the learning isn’t enough of an incentive, it’s good to know that some of the proceeds are going towards saving our environment.

 

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Game Info:

Baldur's Gate: Siege of Dragonspear
Developed by: Beamdog Studios
Published by: Beamdog Studios
Released: March 31, 2016
Available on: Windows, Mac OS X
Genre: Role-playing
ESRB rating: T (animated blood, mild language, use of alcohol and tobacco)
Number of players: 1
Price: $19.99 (requires Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition to play)

Thank you, Beamdog Studios, for sending us a copy of the expansion for review!

The Baldur's Gate games, which were initially released in 1998, received a revamped, "enhanced edition" upgrade in 2013. The new edition was met with high praise, especially from those who remembered the original and were delighted to be able to play it on modern systems. Recently, Beamdog released the first new expansion for the franchise in 15 years. Titled "Siege of Dragonspear," the game plays exactly like the other games, and serves to tell the story between the two games. But is it worth the hype?

In some ways, yes. The game does have a lot of the feel and experience of the original game. You can import your character from the original, or create a new one solely to play the expansion. The gameplay is the same as well. Roughly based on the 2nd Edition Advanced Dungeons and Dragons rules, you make your character and assign points to flesh out your basic stats (Strength, Dexterity, Intelligence, and so forth). You choose a race and a class, and make other choices based on those. The expansion launches you into the game on the assumption that you've played the base game already, so there's no in-game tutorial at this point to help you. (If you haven't played Baldur's Gate yet, you may want to do that first so you'll know how to play the expansion.)

The game is presented as an isomorphic, top-down field, where you move your character through tunnels and wilderness, battle fiendish monsters, get experience and treasure, and all the other tropes that you can expect to find in a role-playing game. Then again, this is Dungeons and Dragons we're talking about – this is the franchise that made most of those tropes in the first place. 

Unfortunately, the player is forced into a railroad plot and not allowed much in the way of variation. The game is supposed to "connect the dots" between the first and second games, but some degree of player choice would have been nice in affecting the outcome. There are several side quests which the player can engage in – some of which are quite amusing – but that's about it. At least you can add some experience and levels to your Baldur's Gate character before importing it into Baldur's Gate II, right?

Highlights:

Strong Points: Adds to the base game; entertaining characters and side quests
Weak Points: Fails to adhere to established lore; confusing battle system; railroad main plot
Moral Warnings: Blood, gore, murder, undead and magic use are all prominent; one transgender character makes a minor appearance.

My biggest criticism of the game is that it lacks the feel of a table-top experience. Everything happens in real-time, and while you can pause the game to issue orders to your characters, combat generally acts out more like a quick time event than a player-controlled battle. Especially at the lower difficulty levels – where victory is guaranteed – combat seems like a pointless addition to the game. It's like Diablo-lite, where the computer controls your character for you so you don't have to do all the thinking. Of course, this is a criticism I had of the original game back in 1998, too. Maybe it's because I grew up with the "Gold Box" series of Dungeons and Dragons games, where combat was turn-based – it's what I'm familiar with, and what I expect from a game sporting the D&D label. Your mileage may vary in this regard. And combat is heavily featured in this expansion – while it's possible to talk your way out of some conflicts, a good portion of the dialogue trees will end up in a battle no matter what you choose.

On top of that, the AI of the characters seems distinctly lacking. There were many times that my party was under fire, and Corwin – who is supposed to be an archer specialized in the longbow – would just stand in one place watching what was going on. Even after ordering her to attack, she'd fire one arrow and continue to watch as the rest of the team got peppered with projectiles. Fortunately, the AI of the computer seems to be just as deficient, with the standard "zerg-rush" approach being the default. It would be easy to lure the enemy into a variety of traps, if only the player-controlled characters were intelligent enough to follow orders. It's possible that this was simply the result of the difficulty level I was playing – "story mode," the easiest setting, so I could explore the plot. In this mode, the characters can't be killed and have received significant buffs in order to blaze through combat. The enemies might show a bit more intelligence at higher difficulties, but somehow I doubt it. 

The voice-acting tends to be a mixed bag – some of the new characters and voices are delightful, and in other places the acting seems stiff or tired. The music is still phenomenal, though. The graphics are identical to those in the base game (although I would have preferred less dwarf-like sprite for Glint, the gnome cleric/thief).

Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 68%
Gameplay - 10/20
Graphics - 7/10
Sound - 7/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 56%
Violence - 3/10
Language - 6.5/10
Sexual Content - 6/10
Occult/Supernatural - 4/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8.5/10

For fans of the franchise – or the Forgotten Realms itself – some of the plot elements may leave them scratching their heads. I was the DM for a campaign set along the Sword Coast for many years, so I know the region quite intimately. Early on, while playing this expansion, it is revealed that thousands of refugees have flooded Baldur's Gate, driven from their homes by Caelen Argent's crusade. My first thought was "fled from where?" Double-checking my map confirmed my suspicions – there are no settlements between Waterdeep and Baldur's Gate. Most of the people living in this region are rugged individualists, who would either die defending their land, or stubbornly rebuild elsewhere. While a few may flee to Baldur's Gate for shelter (Or Scornubel to the east, or Waterdeep to the north), it wouldn't be to such an extent where the city's resources and supplies are strained. This is not the only odd element I've run across in the expansion, and I can't help but wonder how much research the writers did in developing the storyline. Forgotten Realms fans will likely be disappointed with the "artistic licenses" this game takes.

When the game was released, there was a "controversial" element in the game, in the apparent inclusion of a "trans-gender" character. I didn't find the character – a cleric of Tempus named Mizhena – until after I consulted a walkthrough to find where she was located (in the camp of one of the early areas, in case you were wondering). Mizhena looks like any other Flaming Fist mercenary, and doesn't even have her own portrait, so it's easy to overlook her. For some reason, her inclusion set off a lot of people, who proceeded to give the game a "0" score in their own reviews of the game, and prompted Beamdog into editing the game through a patch. In my opinion, the response is overblown. Mizhena has no quests, no relevance to the plot, and isn't even a storekeeper. She feels like the "token minority" that was thrown in so Beamdog could point and say "see? Diversity!" If it wasn't for the fact that the Internet seemed to erupt over Mizhena's inclusion in the game, I likely wouldn't have even mentioned her in this review.

Aside from the transgender issue, there are several other moral considerations to the game. These are all elements of the original Baldur's Gate, so there's nothing new in this list. Swearing is commonplace throughout, although none of the more egregious vulgarities are used. The undead are commonplace enemies. The entire setting is polytheistic, and some of the characters are the result of a union between gods (or other divine beings) and mortals. Some enemies explode into chunks when killed – it's possible to turn off gore in the options menu, though. What can't be turned off are the rivers and pools of blood in some areas, or an eventual visit to a hellish landscape and battles against demons. The player can choose to be evil, if they'd like, and fill their party with evil characters. Finally, the players can control characters who can cast divine or arcane spells, and magic use is prominent. 

So, all in all, the Siege of Dragonspear expansion is an interesting mix. What Baldur's Gate does well, Dragonspear does just as well. Where Baldur's Gate falters, the expansion seems to steer into sheer ineptitude. The new characters and side quests are entertaining, but those who were looking for a seamless transition between Baldur's Gate and Baldur's Gate II will be sorely disappointed – especially if they are fans of the Forgotten Realms. While it may be an interesting experience, I certainly wouldn't pay $19.99 for it, and I don't think it's even worth picking up on sale. Diehard fans of the Baldur's Gate series are better off using their imaginations to connect the two games. It's a disappointing chapter to an otherwise excellent story.

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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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