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Game Info:

Dumb Chicken 2: One Way Out
Developed by: OddChicken Studio
Published by: Black Shell Media
Release date: September 2, 2016
Available on: iOS
Genre: Stealth
Number of players: Single-player
ESRB Rating: Not rated
Price: $2.99

*Advertising disclosure* Though Black Shell Media is a former advertising partner, this review is not influenced by that relationship.

Thank you Black Shell Media for sending us this game to review!

Many people take for granted that games that appear on Steam stay there. I’m the proud owner of a few games that are no longer available on Steam or anywhere else digitally. Dumb Chicken 2: One Way Out falls into that category and now it can only be purchased on its original platform, iOS.

Dumb Chicken 2: One Way Out doesn’t hide its mobile roots very well. The first clue is the loading screen that tells you to tap the screen to continue. Pressing a controller or keyboard button works just as well for those without touch screens. The gameplay follows the mobile formula with quick levels that give you between one and three awards depending on your performance.

Dumb Chicken 2: One Way Out
Highlights:

Strong Points: Over ninety lighthearted and stealthy levels
Weak Points: Obvious mobile port; no longer available on PC
Moral Warnings: Cartoon violence

There are over ninety levels and many of them can be completed in a minute or less if you’re stealthy enough. Your goal in each level is to rescue the kidnapped chickens who will then follow you in a single file line. Of course, this is easier said than done, as there are many creatures on patrol guarding them.

Some of the creatures have lines of vision and predictable patterns to avoid, but others do not. Not only do you have to keep your chicken out of sight, but all of the rescued ones need to remain hidden as well. Thankfully, there are many obstacles to hide behind, or bushes to hide in. Getting to hiding spots quickly can be challenging as the terrain changes. Traversing through grass is a lot quicker than swamplands.

Along with collecting kidnapped chickens, you can collect gold coins and randomly placed power-ups. The gold coins can be used to purchase power-ups. The power-ups include distractions as well as temporary cloaking abilities. There are six different chicken characters to unlock and they each come with a built-in ability. In total, there are forty-one Steam achievements that can be earned by completing the areas as different characters.

Dumb Chicken 2: One Way Out
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 78%
Gameplay - 16/20
Graphics - 7/10
Sound - 7/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 4/5

Morality Score - 96%
Violence - 8/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

Visually, this game is quite colorful and the characters are rather cute. The HD graphics look good and scale well for PC. The levels are all well thought out and offer different challenges to keep them interesting. There is some cartoon violence but it’s pretty tame.

The sound effects are cute and get the job done. In the game’s intro, you’ll hear some catchy music, but during the game itself it’s just background noises.

As far as I can tell, Dumb Chicken 2: One Way Out is no longer available on PC. When it was, it sold for $2.99 and was a pretty good deal. The mobile version is still available for $0.99 and is worth looking into if you’re in the market for a lighthearted stealth game.

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Game Info:

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
Developed by: MachineGames
Published by: Bethesda Softworks
Release date: October 27, 2017
Available on: PS4, Switch, Xbox, Windows
Genre: FPS
Number of players: Single-player
ESRB Rating: Mature for Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Partial Nudity, Sexual Content, Strong Language, Use of Drugs
Price: $39.99
(Amazon Affiliate Link)

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus takes place in 1961 when the Nazis rule America and BJ Blazkowicz, aka “Terror Billy," is one of the few remaining members of the Resistance. The story carries over from New Order and has you re-verify which of the two soldiers you spared from the Nazi General Deathshead. BJ Blazkowicz’s previous victory took quite a toll on him and you’ll witness a bloody surgery involving removing some of his intestines to save his live. You’ll start off the game with only fifty health and being wheelchair bound. I like the overcharge ability that temporarily boosts your health past maximum and slowly brings it back down to normal.

Even in a wheelchair, BJ can seriously kick some Nazi butt. There’s a wide variety of enemies including Nazis, KKK members, dogs, robotic dogs, robotic soldiers, drones, mechs, and ridable fire spewing robotic dogs. To take down these various foes, BJ has access to a lot of fun guns, grenades, and weapons of mass destruction. The laser guns and flame throwers are always fun, but you first have to take down some tough robotic soldiers to gain access to them. Naturally, the world and environment is destructible.

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
Highlights:

Strong Points: Great story; voice acting; and character development
Weak Points: Experienced a couple of game crashes
Moral Warnings: Lots of violence, blood and gore; strong language and blaspheming; prejudice and racism; sex scenes and nudity (breasts shown); alcohol and drug references

The visuals in this game are impressive and quite realistic. The war-ravaged towns, enemies, and friends are all incredibly detailed. This game ran great on my desktop and scales down enough to be run on portable devices like the Nintendo Switch. There are a lot of flashbacks and cinematic sequences. Many of them are sexual or violent in nature. BJ had a troubled childhood with a drunk and abusive father who did not tolerate his friendship and first love with an African American girl.

There are some sexual encounters and references in this game. Breasts are shown during breastfeeding, sleeping, and even in combat. A lot of cussing and blaspheming is heard throughout the story as well. The main campaign can be completed in less than ten hours. There are DLC side stories available if you purchase the season pass. Each of the stories has multiple chapters that add a couple more hours of gameplay. Each of the characters in the side stories can utilize an ability that BJ had access to in the main story. However, BJ had to choose only one upgrade option with others being available through side quests. If you only focus on the main story, this is a good chance to see what you missed.

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 88%
Gameplay - 17/20
Graphics - 10/10
Sound - 8/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 37%
Violence - 0/10
Language - 0/10
Sexual Content - 1/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7.5/10

There’s plenty of side quests and things to look for during the main campaign. Each of the missions have collectible items like gold and toys to locate. By killing generals, you’ll get enigma cards which can be used later to locate and hunt down high ranking Nazis who are in hiding. The enigma machine is a bit of a pain to use since you have to solve enigma puzzles within a certain amount of time or you’ll lose an enigma card trying to crack it. It’s nice that there’s more gameplay available after completing the main story, but the timed enigma puzzles are too much of a hassle for me to bother with the extra quests. I am enjoying the Freedom Chronicles DLC and am looking forward to more chapters to be released.

For an added challenge, you can complete this game on several difficulty levels. You’ll earn a Steam achievement for each difficulty it gets completed on. There are also several in-game achievements that tally up how many overcharged or headshot kills you make.

Though the $59.99 asking price is a bit steep for a ten-hour game, it is fun and continues a great story. I picked it up for a good price during the Steam Christmas sale and it included the season pass. This is in addition to the Xbox One version I bought and gave to my brother since I preferred keyboard and mouse controls over a gamepad. If you enjoyed the previous entries and don’t mind the graphic violence, language, and sexual content, you won’t be disappointed in this one. Though I did experience a couple of random crashes, the autosaves had me lose minimal progress. Despite the crashes my overall experience was a positive one.

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Game Info:

Rogue Stache
Developed by: WubsGames
Published by: Black Shell Media
Release date: January 6, 2017 (Early Access)
Available on: Windows
Genre: Action Platformer
Rating: M for Intense Violence, Blood and Gore, and Language
Number of players: 1
Price: $4.99

*Advertising disclosure* Though Black Shell Media is a former advertising partner, this review is not influenced by that relationship.

Thank you, Black Shell Media, for sending us a review key!

Eye-based aliens have attacked a spacecraft to steal the crewmembers' facial hair. Please, please do not make me spend more time on the setting of this roguelike. The main character will jump, shoot, dash, and shoot through four groups of four levels (each group ending in a boss fight) before progressing to the final boss room. This is a short game, and this is not a weakness. Indeed, the longer the levels go on - certainly if one replays them - the more obvious it becomes that there is little meat on Rogue Stache's bones. There were moments when the mechanics of this simple game combined, almost perversely, to give me an exciting experience. Even then, the tension was based on the hope that, maybe this run, I would finally beat the game and be free of my obligation to play it.

Rogue Stache is, as the name implies, fascinated by facial hair of all kinds. Enemies sporting multi-color mustaches have a higher health pool than average. The player character picks one of several mustaches and beards, each of which grant bonuses and debuffs. Hats, crafted randomly with tokens picked up in levels and boss fights, add similar effects. Every five levels of experience, the player is given a choice of random stat upgrades. Any variety Rogue Stache has comes from these various buffs and debuffs. Some raise your speed, health, or fire rate; others grant bonuses to your in-game super mode, Stache Power. Stache Power charges up as you kill enemies, and unleashing it gives your weapons unlimited ammo and increased fire rate for a short duration. Upon level 5, you might be given the chance to upgrade Stache Power to make your character invincible for the duration. This is the kind of upgrade that feels like it really should have been in the base package.

Rogue Stache
Highlights:

Strong Points: Weapons feel powerful; short, gratifying loop of experience and power-ups
Weak Points: Repetitive level design; repetitive enemy design; repetitive weapons; repetitive music; uneven controller support
Moral Warnings: Lots of blood and gore; "hell" as a swear word; killing of humanoid zombies

This is because enemies are cheap in almost every sense. There are not very many of them, so their cheap assets are copied and pasted with almost no variety in all levels. Some enemies are dropped out of the boundaries of the procedurally-generated levels. But several enemies are cheap in the sense that they kill you very quickly with little chance to fight back. These enemies tend to come in swarms, either of piranha-like flying...things or floating, high-health, exploding eyes. As is typical for the genre, death means restarting from the first stage, at level one, with whatever base upgrades you have unlocked. There is something to be said for making a roguelike difficult, but the difficulty should contribute to the game in some way. In Rogue Stache, the cheap enemy swarms primarily give you a reason to use invulnerable Stache Power; without them, you'd be in little danger of death. There'd be little danger, that is, until the final boss that spams its small chamber with beams like it's in Ikaruga without giving the player room to maneuver. Suffice to say that I never enjoyed engaging the enemy while playing Rogue Stache. One boss must have felt similarly indifferent because, despite having "flame" in its name and appearing in promotional material shooting a flamethrower, it never spurt so much as a spark at me.

A surplus of weapons attempts to spice up the game. Different weapons fire in arcs, fire rapidly, pierce enemies, and so on. There are a good number of them, and some are particularly well-suited to certain enemy types. For example, the flamethrower kills the flying piranha things quickly. For another example--uh. ... Hm. No, that's all I've got. Certainly many weapons are more powerful than the starting pistol, but, again, I wouldn't say they are particularly enjoyable to use.

I alluded to fun in the opening paragraph, and a particular combination of mechanics will explain why. Killing enemies raises experience until a level up. Leveling up gives your character back full health. Some enemies are cheap nigh-insta-killers. Stache Power kills enemies quickly, thus giving experience quickly. The most exciting gameplay loop I experienced was getting knocked to almost zero health while just shy of Stache Power. I would then need to carefully snipe enemies until the power fully charged. Once it did, I would trigger it and jump invincibly and gleefully - yes, Rogue Stache made me feel gleeful - into a hoard of cheap insta-killers and paste them against the walls with abandon. My goal was not so much to clear the way as to hit the next level to regain full health. These experiences required a little bit of tactics, which surprised me in a game so determined to go down like stale sugar cookies otherwise.

Rogue Stache
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 52%
Gameplay - 10/20
Graphics - 5/10
Sound - 4/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 3/5

Morality Score - 74%
Violence - 2/10
Language - 7/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

Keyboard and mouse control rarely gave me problems. In fact, I often accidentally performed dashes and wall jumps that turned out better than whatever I had planned on. The gun follows the mouse cursor anywhere on screen, allowing you to line up shots on enemies as they come around walls. My time with the Steam Controller was more problematic. The aiming reticle was reluctant to follow my thumb, and controller mode locks the reticle in a tight radius around the main character. Perhaps a different controller would have better results; then again, the Steam store page does advertise "full controller support."

If you need a reason not to play, the game is incredibly bloody and gory. Bodies and eyes bleed and blow apart. Fleshy appendages dart across the screen. It's not highly graphic, exactly (it was hours before I realized that the melee weapon is a knife instead of a shovel), but it is very red. The only voice acting comes from the main character shouting, "Oh, yeah," and "h*ll yeah," after a kill or weapon pickup. On occasion, such as in Steam Trading Cards, the word bad*** makes an appearance.

Rogue Stache is in early access. I understand that it feels short and repetitive, and it has the basic mechanics to enable a fun shooter-platformer in the future. Unfortunately, the enemy types and level variety to turn this game into something fun have yet to be created. That may happen, that may not. In the meantime, the highest praise Rogue Stache earns is that, whatever else it is, it is not pretentious.

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Game Info:

Septerra Core
Developed by: Monolith
Published by: Topware Interactive
Released: October 31, 1999
Available on: Linux, macOS, Windows
Genre: RPG
ESRB rating: T for Teen (animated blood, animated violence)
Number of players: 1
Price: $4.99

During the 1990s, a slew of role-playing games hit the market. Some went on to become powerful franchises, while others faded into obscurity. Still others turned into “sleeper hits,” receiving little attention when they were first released, but they gained a steadfast fan following. “Septerra Core,” from Topware Interactive, falls into this category. Released in 1999, it has a dedicated following, and many of our readers have wanted us to do a review of this game.

The world of Septerra consists of several continents arranged as a series of shells, in a sort of clockwork structure. Every 100 years, the continents align in such a fashion that light from the sun can reach the core, and with the proper key, can supposedly unlock the doors to Heaven. Septerra Core focuses on a young woman named Maya. Her hometown and family were destroyed by a group living on the shell above hers, and she burns with a desire for vengeance. Her efforts lead her to become embroiled in a plot to unite the pieces of the key and activate the core, and the fate of the entire world is at stake.

The plot is adequate to move the story forward, but doesn't deviate too much from an “on the rails” format. While the pacing is somewhat sluggish, it is interesting enough to keep moving forward. It doesn't get much better than “interesting,” though; there really aren't any “wow” moments, or character traits that really hook the player, compelling them to play more in order to see what happens next. The world itself is intriguing, at least; an odd mishmash of cyberpunk and fantasy, with dashes of steampunk mixed in. Maya wields a large-caliber gun called a Vulcan in combat, but also can cast magic spells. One of her companions is a skilled mechanic and even constructs robot dogs, but prefers to wield wooden staves and is one of the best spellcasters in the game. The graphics are quite dated, though. The game looks like it came from the '90s, and many of the characters are simply recolors of each other. The voice acting is well done, and the music fits the tone well.

Septerra Core
Highlights:

Strong Points: Interesting storyline; full voice acting
Weak Points: Clunky, redundant combat system; confusing and unnecessary magic system; long
Moral Warnings: Language; some blood; magic system involves tarot-like cards

One of the biggest weaknesses in the game is the combat. Septerra Core attempts to make a mashup of real-time and turn-based combat. Your characters have a charge meter of sorts, and the longer you wait for this meter to fill, the more powerful your attack can be when you press the button to act. While you're waiting, though, your opponents also can attack, based on their own (hidden) charge meter. So it becomes a bit of a balancing act of deciding to wait for a more powerful attack, or trying for several quicker, but less damaging attacks. In many ways, the actions you can take in combat resemble JRPGs. Your character can launch attacks, or cast spells, or use items when you initiate your turn. However, the limitations become obvious – and aggravating – when you first encounter the undead in the game. One of the actions that zombies can take on their turn is to shuffle slowly toward one of the characters in your party. This isn't exactly a problem – they hit like a truck, and it's nice to have time to wear them down before they get close. But it's pathetic that the best way to defeat these creatures – backing away while hitting them with your ranged weapons – is denied to you simply because of the fact that you don't have the choice of moving in combat. Your characters can leap from the middle of the party, smack an opponent with a stick, and then leap back into formation, but can't manage the simple act of walking away? While the combat system is different from many other role-playing games, it's executed in a clumsy, often irritating, fashion.

Even worse than the combat system, though, is the magic system. You are given one magical, tarot-like card near the beginning of the game, as well as some rudimentary instruction on how to use it. You discover more cards over the course of the game, which unlock more spells. The problem is that there's nothing in the game that explains how these cards are supposed to interact with each other, or how to use them effectively. I actually had to look up a guide on the Internet to make any sense of what you are supposed to do, and even then it seemed to me that it would be more effective to simply use your standard attacks and items – especially given the limits in the collective magic pool where all party members draw magical energy from. The magic system seems superfluous to the game as a whole. While it could potentially flesh out the game world, it also can be completely ignored with no real effect on the gameplay. As a result, combat becomes little more than a grind – wear down your opponents, eat food when your health gets low, repeat. Fighting the bosses isn't any different than fighting the trash mobs. It got to the point where I actively tried to find ways to avoid fighting simply to save time.

Septerra Core
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 54%
Gameplay - 10/20
Graphics - 4/10
Sound - 5/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 4/5

Morality Score - 72%
Violence - 6/10
Language - 5/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 7/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

The game is quite lengthy, and some players report putting 50 or more hours into it. Part of the issue, though, is the lack of a fast travel option. Sometimes to revisit certain key locations, you need to pass through areas several times, often at points where the enemies no longer pose a challenge to you, but you are forced to fight them anyway. A lack of a journal also doesn't help, as it can be easy to lose track of what you're supposed to be doing next. There are guides available on the Internet to help you get back on track, at least. If you're playing the game on Steam, there are no achievements, but you can at least get trading cards. As a final note, those using the Mac and Linux ports should be aware that the developers have used Wine to handle the translation from the original Windows release, so there could be the potential for bugs or slowdowns from having to deal with an emulator. Your mileage may vary in this regard.

There are a few elements to consider in regards to the moral front. A few naughty words do appear, such as b****rd and a**e, but they tend to be few and far between. The Lord's name also is taken in vain a couple times. There is an occasional spray of blood from attacks, but the blood doesn't remain, and corpses quickly fade away when they fall. Undead appear in a few areas, but given the crude graphics they aren't very detailed. There are references to demons, including the ability to summon and command beings that claim to be demons, but the theological system is one of fantasy. The mythology of the game does borrow heavily from Christian theology (e.g. the “savior” of the world is the only-begotten son of the “Creator”) but this shouldn't be mistaken for a Christian game by any means.

Septerra Core is well-loved by those who played it in the 1990s. Is it a good game? Sure, it has some good qualities. But is it a great game? A classic? I would argue that this assessment is a stretch. The dated graphics, the sluggish plot, and the poorly implemented combat and magic systems can make this game more of a chore than an escape. Other role-playing games from this era were much more solid. Although it has a few fans, Septerra Core is deservedly forgotten.

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Game Info:

Divinity: Original Sin 2
Developed by: Larian Studios
Published by: Larian Studios
Release date: September 14, 2017
Available on: Windows
Genre: RPG
Number of players: Up to four players online or locally
ESRB Rating: Not rated
Price: $44.99

Thank you Larian Studios for sending us this game to review!

I previously reviewed and was impressed with Divinity: Original Sin – Enhanced Edition on the PS4. It’s no surprise that Divinity: Original Sin 2 was successfully Kickstarted and met all of its stretch goals bringing the final pledges to over two million dollars. There is much to be praised in this game with the high quality audio and visuals, but like the first game, there are many moral issues to note as well. Since this game has not been released on consoles yet, it does not have an ESRB rating. I imagine that it will receive a mature rating like its predecessor. If you haven't played the previous title, you may miss some references, but the story in this one is independent from the prequel.

When creating your character you can choose an origin character with a backstory, or customize your character from the ground up. I went with the origin character Lohse, who is a female bard that is demon possessed. With all of the females hitting on my character early on in the game, I figured that her sexuality was predefined as well. Thankfully, I was able to pursue romance with males and even one of my mysterious party members. Having the narrator describe sexual encounters in detail was interesting, but thankfully, nothing was shown other than my character being in her bra and underwear afterwards. Her “getting lucky” carried over a lucky status that temporarily boosted her luck attribute.

The voices in this game are phenomenal and every line from NPCs and main characters alike is fully voice acted by top-notch actors. The world is beautiful as well and you’ll get to explore numerous islands and the great beyond. There are several gods in this game and you can pay homage at their shrines and use them to teleport to different areas quickly. Because of your character’s magic abilities, they are referred to as a godwoken.

Divinity: Original Sin 2
Highlights:

Strong Points: Fun gameplay and lots to explore; challenging battles; high quality and fully voiced acted; gorgeous visuals
Weak Points: Experienced some crashes to desktop; not available on consoles (yet)
Moral Warnings: Intense violence with blood and gore shown; magic use; pentacles seen on many spell books and underneath the spellcaster; zombies and other creatures summoned by necromancers; language (b*stard, d*mn, sh*t); prejudice; drinking and drunkenness; sexual encounters can happen with any gender and different species

In the beginning of the game, you’ll have a couple of strikes against you. A collar preventing source/magic is around your neck and if/when it gets removed, you’ll initiate a battle between any magisters who see you collarless. Magisters are not the only ones after you; voidwokens will attack your party as you explore the various islands.

Up to four members can be in your party at any given time. You can split your party up and the teleport pyramids make a welcome comeback in this game. Playing alongside real people is also possible with the local co-op and online matching making. Secondary players will need to use controllers, but I still prefer keyboard and mouse.

The battles are turn-based and are not easy. You’ll have to use your environment wisely. When attacking your enemy, blood will spill and you can use it to conduct electricity with a shock attack. There are many schools of magic including elemental and necromancy types. You can summon a swarm of mosquitoes to attack your foes or hack at them with enchanted weapons. Characters are not limited to RPG stereotypes and you can customize them as you see fit. Sure, some weapons, spells, and armor have requirements that need to be met before equipping them, but you can allocate the needed points as you level up.

If you increase your persuasion, you may be able to sweet talk your way out of some tricky situations. Automatically reflecting damage back to the enemies is nice too. There are so many great skills available and you can fully customize your party members to get all your bases and/or elemental attacks covered.

Divinity: Original Sin 2
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 94%
Gameplay - 20/20
Graphics - 9/10
Sound - 9/10
Stability - 4/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 24%
Violence - 2/10
Language - 2.5/10
Sexual Content - 0/10
Occult/Supernatural - 0/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7.5/10

The inventory is shared among the party, but objects are usually carried by the person who picks it up. Some items you’ll want to have on hand include resurrection scrolls, healing potions, a magnifying glass for identifying items, a shovel for digging up treasure, and a repair hammer for fixing equipment.

There is plenty to do in this game and the islands you visit are pretty sizable. Lots of side quests are available to keep you busy. Besides the main story, you can attempt to become the champion at different underground fighting arenas. By becoming a champion and completing this game on various difficulty levels, you’ll earn Steam achievements. There are ninety-seven Steam achievements available and close to a hundred hours of playtime for a single run through the game.

While there is much to like, there is also much to be wary of from a moral standpoint. Like the first game, there is a lot of unavoidable magic. Pentacles are seen on some spell books and the floor below the spell caster. There’s quite a bit of language too so you won’t want to play this game around children within earshot. I already touched on the blood and sexual content earlier in this review.

If the moral issues bothered you in the previous game then you’ll want to steer clear of this one as well. However, if you enjoyed the first Divinity: Original Sin, then you’ll definitely want to add this one to your library. The game is reasonably priced and provides a lot of bang for the buck. I did experience a crash or two but thankfully the game auto saves often so not much progress was lost. Hopefully, console gamers will get to enjoy Divinity: Original Sin 2 someday soon.

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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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