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Game Info:

Glyphs: Apprentice
Developed By: inSPIRE Games
Published By: inSPIRE Games
Released: March 16, 2017
Available On: Windows
Genre: Puzzle
ESRB Rating: None
Number of Players: Single player
Price: $9.99

Thank you inSPIRE Games for sending us this game to review!

Glyphs: Apprentice is a puzzle game produced by inSPIRE Games, and if their advertising is anything to go by, they're determined to set your critical thinking skills ablaze. They warned all puzzle aficionados to bring their whiteboards and patience. At least, that's what they claimed you'd need should you enter their latest domain. So what kind of role are you playing in this supposed mental gauntlet? You're an aspiring mystic, studying sorcery in order to create the most potent spells ever known. . . . Oh, boy.

So how do you conduct these spellbinding tasks? Well first, you need to pick a spell pattern. There are three difficulty levels with three Glyphs each. Each Glyph is made up of anywhere between seven to thirteen pieces, and each piece equals one puzzle. Do the math, and you'll realize there are about sixty-three of these things. Thankfully, the menu is a breeze to navigate. Just choose a difficulty, pick a glyph, then peruse the list of pieces. This format is very serviceable. It's in no way groundbreaking, but easy to navigate. Count your blessings, because you're going to be very thankful for that.

Your goal in every puzzle is the same. On a graph, you must build an assembly line from a magic generator to an accumulator in order to transform energy balls into the specified shape. To fix up these light balls you are provided an endless supply of tools. Some change its inner shape. Some change its outer shape. Others can bind energies together in various thicknesses, but the tools you'll use the most are the arms. They alone can move energy spheres around and activate other tools. So far this all sounds fine and dandy. It certainly is nothing catastrophic. You know your goal and how to do it. However, you'll find the 'how' is going to wreck your resolve. All that ethereal machinery ain't gonna do squat by itself.

Glyphs: Apprentice
Highlights:

Strong Points: Beautiful Design Work
Weak Points: Taxing Puzzles, Convoluted Gameplay, No Music
Moral Warnings: Sorcery, Transgender Symbol Present

When inSPIRE said you'd need a whiteboard to solve their puzzles, they weren't kidding. Do you like programming? If not, sorry. If so, good for you. You've entered the kiddie pre-lesson experience. Each arm is equipped with its own little grid where you need to insert a cornucopia of inputs into the empty slots. The colored squares you place will tell the arm how to move, when to move, and even when to pause. This bit right here is where the difficulty gets real. If energies clash, you fail. If two arms grab the same energy, you fail. On top of that, your mini manufacturing plant has to produce eight finished shapes in nonstop cycles. That last stipulation alone can ruin everything. If one, and I mean one little thing is off, it might work on the first revolution, but come the second lap, it all falls apart and takes a chain reaction of adjustments to fix . . . right up until a new problem crops up. It's daunting. I'd suggest heeding inSPIRE Games' advice and have paper and pencil on hand. 'Cause unless your memory is exceptional, you'll likely need your notes to keep your head on straight. I hadn't had to do that for a game since the Myst series. Whether or not that's a good thing depends on the person. I myself enjoy a good challenge, and the creators definitely didn't skimp on their promise. They get points for honesty.

However, Glyphs gets unnecessarily nasty thanks to its convoluted layout. The learning curve is steep, like cliffside steep, and it can take hours just to solve the easy puzzles. The more I played, the more I bemoaned its lacking ease of access. You can't readily double check your work on other arms, so it forces you to jump hoops just to program a single arm. Thus, you'll mess up because you miscounted moves, forgot which arm activated what, or which way you had them twist/turn. You'll also wish there was a replay loop button able to isolate specific points in your plan, but no. Glyphs doesn't have that. It says, 'You want to figure that pesky middle part out? Nope. Start at the beginning. If you can't get past that? Too bad so sad. Fix me.' Not only does this sometimes bar you from making that one teeny adjustment that can fix everything, it also renders experimentation impossible. That really bites. Solving those algorithms is mind splitting enough. I shouldn't have fight the game just to test my ideas. Even the tutorial is exhaustive. It taught each tool's function but failed to explain a few input commands that could have saved me a few headaches. Now, I for one love puzzles. I love hard earned accomplishment. It's so satisfying to see my clockwork masterpieces clicking along, but when it's this twisted a labyrinth to actually play, it's a dreaded chore.

Glyphs: Apprentice
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 54%
Gameplay - 14/20
Graphics - 6/10
Sound - 1/10
Stability - 3/5
Controls - 3/5

Morality Score - 82%
Violence - 10/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 2.5/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8.5/10

Okay, as for Glyphs' presentation: there is very little to talk about. It seemed nearly all of the creator's efforts were spent on the puzzles. Premise aside, there is no story. The game has one measly sound effect, and that's that. There's no music either. I really disliked that exclusion. Thus what's left is an environment with little to draw from or be drawn into. You'll be staring at those lists, manuals, and graphs the entire time, and it can come across as a bare minimum effort. However, this game's presentation has one saving grace: those spell patterns. They are gorgeous. I've never witnessed such an angelic display of glowing lines weaved with such artistic intent quite like this. The way that sky blue tinge adds a soft texture to those pure white wisps is an especially nice touch. Same goes for the tools and light energy you'll be using. The tiny tangled curves in their designs are all very pleasing to the eye. Unfortunately, (aside from a couple game crashes) that's pretty much it. Sounds a bit hollow, doesn't it?

Okay, so there's not a lot to see, nothing to hear, and the challenges are one step short of calculus. How are its ethics? Putting it bluntly, Glyphs won't be winning prizes in the morals olympics. First of all, there is a transgender symbol in the final spell pattern. That mars that part. Unfortunately, the second problem pollutes everything else. Magic is a tricky topic for Christians. Clearly, I'm not alluding to the likes of Houdini or rabbits in top hats. I'm talking about the bippidi-boppidi-boo, this glass will be a shoe, wand waving. Where does the line from fictitious fun to immoral spellcasting start and stop? Opinions vary wildly, but I find Glyphs cozies way too close to Wiccan philosophy for comfort. Its premise alone disturbed me. Throughout Scripture, God taught we were to seek and rely on Him in all things, but Occult and Wiccan practice is all about empowering self. It's in direct conflict. Sadly, Glyphs not only adopted this worldview but also used it to give players their main incentive. To flavor an adventure with fictitious pixie dust is one thing, but to glorify a sinful practice and its core teaching is another.

It's about as hard to fully explain Glyphs as it is to play Glyphs. I truly admire the great lengths inSPIRE Games took to conjure up such a challenge (pun intended). How on earth they put it all together without melting their own brains I'll never know. Plus, the art it did have was truly lovely. Kudos to them, but I think they took their goals a bit too far. Puzzle diehards and aspiring programmers are bound to get their fix from Glyphs, but its extreme complexity can potentially turn off everyone else. If they just added or streamlined a few features, it certainly would have smoothed the ride. I'm sure with more time and practice I could get really into it. That is, of course, if I could ignore all that witchcraft its been smothered in. I won't say I was completely repulsed by Glyphs: Apprentice - just disenchanted.

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Game Info:

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes
Developed by: Steel Crate Games
Published by: Steel Crate Games
Released: October 8, 2015
Available On: Windows, macOS, PlayStation 4, HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, OSVR
ESRB Rating: Not Rated
Genre: Puzzle
Number of Players: 2 or more
Mode: Local co-op
Price: $14.99
(Humble Store Link)

“Hello, this is the bomb defusal hotline; how may we assist you today?” This was my friend Bob (all names changed). Over the speaker phone we heard Sara’s answer: “Hi, I seem to be locked in a room with a bomb.” She was down the hall with my laptop, a phone, and no idea what to do.

“I’m sorry to hear that,” I said. “Could you describe the bomb, please?” Bob and I had no idea what we were doing, either. This was our first time playing Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes. In the next five minutes we would experience the stress of communication troubles, logic puzzles, and a pressing timer. With five seconds left, we also felt the thrill of triumph. The bomb was defused; Sara was saved.

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes is a cooperative PC game in which one player, the Defuser, is stuck in a virtual room with a bomb on a timer. The rest of the players, called the Experts, have a manual; inside are instructions for defusing the bomb. The Defuser can’t look at the manual, and the Experts can’t look at the bomb. They all have to keep talking to save the Defuser from a digital explosion.

This game requires different resources than the average PC multiplayer setup. There is no single-player mode. Players need a computer for the Defuser, a way to communicate with the Experts, and a manual. My first game used a phone, but players can just as easily sit in the same room as long as the Experts keep their eyes off the computer screen. The manual is available for viewing and download from http://www.bombmanual.com/. I recommend printing for the best experience. While the manual can be viewed on a phone or tablet, a paper copy allows faster page flipping and note taking, tasks essential to the Experts’ role. There is a VR version of the game and manual available via Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, OSVR, and PS VR. Although I have not had the opportunity to try the VR experience, gameplay is identical in all versions.

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes
Highlights:

Strong Points: Team/communication skill building; short levels mean mistakes don’t hurt for long; only one copy needed for multiplayer; simple controls
Weak Points: Brief overall; no single-playe moder; repetitive without resorting to community-made levels; puzzles are less challenging once players become familiar with the game
Moral Warnings: Centered on bombs; within the world of the game, the player, not the character, "dies" when you lose

The bomb can have anywhere from three to eleven separate modules that need solving. They range from the basic—a yellow button labeled "Disarm"—to the complex—a maze with invisible walls. There are wires, passwords, symbols, Morse code, and more. Each module has a corresponding page in the manual. The Defuser might see a box with five wires. Which should be cut? Only the Experts can answer, using the page titled “On the Subject of Wires.” As the Defuser describes the bomb and Experts figure out what to do, time leaks away. If the players make a mistake such as cutting the wrong wire, they get a strike, and the timer ticks down faster. If the timer hits zero or the Defuser gets three strikes, the bomb explodes.

At its heart, this is a game about communication. The Defuser describes what he sees, and the Experts give instructions. The manual is filled with mini logic puzzles such as, “If there are no yellow wires and the last digit of the serial number is odd, cut the third wire.” The manual is clever and obtuse. "On the Subject of Complex Wires" features the most convoluted Venn diagram I've ever had to use. "On the Subject of Who's on First" exploits homophones to great effect. Generally, the puzzles would be trivial if one could see the bomb and the manual. The fun is in the division of information between the two groups. For example, one module is a keypad with four random symbols. It is the Defuser’s job to make the Expert see the symbols without looking at them.

Defuser: “I see a weird six, a spider with a shield, a smiley face, and an X on an I.”
Expert: “Wait, an Eye?”
Defuser: “No, an I.”

Gameplay is tense. Everyone can hear the timer beeping away, and it prevents players from being entirely certain they are making the right move. You will get lots of laughs from Defusers pressing the wrong button, Experts making simple mistakes, and everybody deciding it's just time to pick a wire and hope. Even when things are going well, you feel the race against the clock. Every successful defusal is a rush.

Upon playing, you will likely learn how the other players communicate, think, and act under pressure. You will certainly have fun. It is everything office team-building exercises want to be, and levels average only five minutes. Gameplay is inherently rewarding and might forge new friendships. Though there is one Defuser, there can be as many Experts as you want. Keep Talking, which naturally draws people in (how often do you hear someone shout, “Cut the red wire”?), can easily expand to about five players.

Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 84%
Gameplay - 16/20
Graphics - 8/10
Sound - 8/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 94%
Violence - 7/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

There is no story here unless the players role-play. The tutorial is a two-minute affair which teaches how to use the mouse to interact with the bomb. The controls are easy and responsive, and this tutorial pulls off the difficult feat of teaching people who are not used to three digital dimensions how to rotate the bomb. The graphics are modest, making the information on the bomb easy to parse. When I play in a public area, I make a habit of asking random passers-by if they have five free minutes. Almost anyone who plays can manage the controls and understand the manual. Keep Talking takes the uninitiated and turns them into competent players in minutes. It’s a great party game.

Simplicity is a strength and a weakness, however. There are few levels and limited modules. Every level is randomized each time you play, but all randomization takes place within the confines of the manual. Over time, players develop codes and procedures for modules. The Defuser rattles off the information he knows the Expert needs; then he just waits for an answer. In short, the more proficient players become at communicating within the game, the fewer surprises and laughs the game can offer.

Don’t let that stop you from trying this game out. The Steam Workshop has additional modules and manuals which players have added to the base game, should you want to mod it. If not, the solution to rote play is bringing on fresh players and mixing up the roles. The fun will return when the newcomer says, “There’s an abort button. I’m pressing it.”

If the premise of the game is not a moral concern, nothing else about it will be, either. The “explosion” is limited to a stock sound and the screen turning black. The game takes place in a small room that shows slight damage from previous explosions. The game is first-person; it is you, not some character, who explodes when you lose. There is music typical of a spy thriller that slowly builds as the timer counts down. Stress builds, too, and it can cause conflicts amongst the players if they let it. Then again, so can office team-building exercises.

I highly recommend Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes. The price is reasonable for the fun you can have as a group. The game is lightweight and can run on a laptop. If you are close to anyone who hasn’t tried a video game before, buy this game and ask for five minutes of their time. You will be glad you did.

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Game Info:

DOOM
Developed By: id Software, Certain Affinity/Escalation Studios (Multiplayer)
Published By: Bethesda Softworks
Released: May 13, 2016
Available On: Steam (Windows), PS4, Xbox One
Genre: First Person Shooter
ESRB Rating: M for Mature: Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Strong Language
Number of Players: 1 offline, 12 online 
Price: $29.99
(Humble Store Link)

Ah nostalgia, it can be a very powerful thing. People love nostalgic properties because it can remind them of the good old days. We’ve been in a pretty big nostalgic boom these days 'cause all of the 80's and 90's kids are now 80’s and 90’s adults. Said adults are not at the mercy of mom and dad, and now have access to their own money. What better way to spend money than on a trip down to your carefree days of childhood, where the only thing you had to worry about back then were grades and Saturday morning cartoons. Doom is the latest attempt to the nostalgia cash in to grab the Millennial's money. But is this Doom only meant to sucker desperate people out of their hard earned paychecks?

Doom of 2016 is a reboot of sorts of the original Doom series, with the ever known Doom Slayer (or Doomguy) enacting his revenge on the forces of hell with the only way he knows how; by breaking the bones and ripping out the guts of every demon he comes across. In hopes to wash away the bad taste Doom 3 left in many fans' mouths, the Doom of new attempts to return to its roots and bring back the quick and hectic style the series is known for. Doom as you know is a First Person Shooter, where the entire game is seen through the player character's eyes. The plot takes place on the planet Mars where our main character, with the help of two AI assistants, have to stop the forces of Hell from taking over the planet, and a woman by the name of Olivia Pierce who may or may not be the cause of said major issue.

The gameplay is part action-adventure, with your character walking through the lands of Mars and Hell, finding power-ups and abilities along the way, while fending off the many enemies that want to stop him. Every once in a while, our Doomguy finds himself in an arena-like area, and this is where the game truly shines as you are tasked to eliminate all your enemies in the vicinity.. Doomguy is fast, outpacing every demon he comes across. This gives the game a wonderful sense of speed, as you need to be constantly maneuvering and quickly thinking of a plan to blow your enemies to bits, without becoming bits yourself. Doomguy can soar through the air with little effort, almost as if he had wings, and can turn and stop on a dime. The weapons at his disposal are shotguns, machine guns, rocket launchers, Gauss cannons, and even the ever famous BFG9000 and chainsaw (which are relegated to special type weapons).

Highlights:

Strong Points: Fast, frantic, fluid combat. Wide variety of weapons and secrets.
Weak Points: Fairly weak ending. Multiplayer is lackluster.
Moral Warnings: Usage of demonic powers and imagery. Strong use of swearing. Insanely violent and bloody.

All your favorite enemies are back like the Cacodemon, Reverant, Mancubus and others, and they got new tricks up their sleeve to try and halt your progress. Like the games of old, your health does not regenerate on its own, so you have to forage for health instead of cowering behind a wall waiting for it to regenerate. The weapons all feel like they pack a punch as they are loud, expansive, and all have a distinct weight and sound to them, as they tear apart the enemies that stand in your way. They even have a few temporary power-ups that can either make you even faster, or eradicate your enemies in one punch. Something fairly unique to Doom is the Glory Kills, taking inspiration from the mod Brutal Doom. They are quick cinematic kills, similar to fatalities from the Mortal Kombat series that one can execute when an enemy glows yellow, giving you ammo and health drops. Glory Kills fortunately do not break the flow of combat, as they are a quick animation and transition very well. You can shoot, perform a Glory Kill, and proceed to hop around the battlefield without missing a beat.

Did I mention that this game is violent? Because oh is it ever so. You bash, tear and gib your enemies in such spectacular fashion with anything that you can get your hands on, and sometimes even with your hands. Blood splatters everywhere, and depending on the weaponry used, guts will fly. This game is extremely violent, and enjoys every single second of it. The soundtrack and quality of the game mostly consists of types of rock, techno, and metal. If you like that kind of music, it's a very solid choice as they really put you in the mood of the nature of the game. The voice acting isn’t anything to write home about with it being fairly standard. The controls feel sharp, precise, and accurate. I never felt at any moment that the times I died were at the fault of unresponsive controls. The game itself has sharp graphics, and even though it only takes place in three areas, the scenery and atmosphere never feel stale.

Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 84%
Gameplay - 17/20
Graphics - 8/10
Sound - 7/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 45%
Violence - 0/10
Language - 5/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 0/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7.5/10

There are quite a bit of moral warnings in this game. There is heavy usage of demonic and occult imagery such as the inverted pentagram for example. Your main character is implied to gain his power form Hell itself, your main enemies are demons, there are Satanic symbols seen throughout the game, swearing is present throughout the game with a few F’s and S’s here and there. Oddly enough, your character uses his demonic power to save others, not destroy them (besides the demons), which is a very interesting take for a game. Some of the log pieces found throughout the game even give detail on how the demons are absolutely terrified of Doomguy and the lengths they’ve taken to try and rid of him in the past.

Besides the game ending on a cliffhanger, and sometimes the game stopping you at points for unneeded exposition dumps, I had very little issues with the single player campaign. Sadly, I personally cannot say this about the multiplayer. The multiplayer side, created by the assistance of developers who worked on Halo 5 and Call of Duty’s multiplayer as well as Disney Infinity? Well, that’s kinda out of left field. Anyways, I wasn't a fan of the multiplayer as it felt slower, floaty, and a bit more laid back, than the high intensity and adrenaline rushing single player. The multiplayer takes a more class-based approach with people choosing a preloaded or customized loadout into battle, akin to Call of Duty and Battlefield to kill each other, and the ability to turn into the demons of Hell from the singleplayer portion. I do have to give it some positives, as it does have some exclusive weapons to its multiplayer portion, as well as the pretty deep Snapmap portion of the multiplayer. Sadly, I don’t have a creative bone in my body so I tend to stray away from user created content, but I’ve heard only good things about that portion.

Doom took me about two sessions to beat, in which I played 6 hours each. I have not encountered any game breaking bugs, crashes or detrimental glitches while going through. In a way it’s not a very long game, only lasting 13 levels, but there are many reasons to come back for more demon squashing action such as the loads of secrets and lore in each level, with some even being retro levels of the original Doom, played in the modern engine. The multiplayer has a fair replayability with its DLC packs and a fairly lengthy leveling system if that is your sort of thing. Multiple difficulty levels for all types of players can warrant multiple playthroughs (with a Ultra-Nightmare difficulty where if you die even once, you have to start the entire game over again). They even added an Arcade Mode, introduced in a recent update. From a very sour first impression from the cinematic heavy E3 trailer to the lackluster and disappointing multiplayer beta that I took part in before release, my expectations were blown away from the single player. It is a very welcomed and much needed return to its roots and a huge step in the right direction. I personally think shooters need to take notes from Doom as the game is worth buying for the campaign alone. It's a nice modern take on an old established IP and is worth a go for any FPS fan, though for some people new to the whole Doom franchise, the heavy use of demonic imagery, occult usage and gray moral ethics of the characters may turn one off from such an experience.

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Game Info:

Hover: Revolt Of Gamers
Developer: Midgar Studio, Fusty Game
Published by: PLAYDIUS Ent., Plug In Digital, The Sidekicks
Release Date: May 31, 2017
Available on: Windows, (PS4 and Xbox One releases coming later.)
Genre: Action, Adventure, Racing
Players: 1-10
ESRB Rating: unrated
Price: $19.99
(Humble Store Link)

Thank you Fusty Games & Midgar Studio for sending us this game to review!

After today's game I feel like I should be shouting "only Nineties kids remember" while trying to do some hardcore parkour. Hover: Revolt Of Gamers is a parkour challenge game in which you live in a society that outlaws entertainment. While they claim inspiration from Jet Set Radio, this adventure is original from top to bottom. Set your neon waves on high and run fast, gamers; this is Hover: Revolt Of Gamers.

In Hover, you're a clone that escapes from an experimental lab. The Gamer Rebellion rescues you and asks you to join them in taking down The Man. With every form of leisure and entertainment illegal, the only way to rebel is to have fun. Run quests, have races with others, and level up to get around the world and end anti-leisure tyranny.

So once you create your character and get out of the tutorial zone you can play the game how you want. You level up your rank by completing challenges, and every trick and mission you do earns your character experience points. Instead of stats, you have a grid that slowly unlocks as you level up. Items you earn can be placed in the grid and what you place will increase your abilities. Some missions will even unlock new clones you can make that have different stats from the base character. If you make new clones for your team you will start where you left off and you can level them without having to repeat missions. Starting a new team is where you can start a game from the beginning.

Hover: Revolt Of Gamers
Highlights:

Strong Points: This game has a fun and inviting world with great visuals and music. The gameplay itself is perfectly crafted for this type of game. Nothing goes to waste.
Weak Points: The goofy story can become a bit annoying. The leveling system is boring and takes away from this lively and vibrant world.
Moral Warnings: Unless graffiti art bugs you, you won't have any moral worries with this game.


The game's missions are very well designed. While each mission has some similarities to others I never felt anything get repetitive. They build off your learned skills, making it harder and harder yet you're ready for the challenge when you get there. The world, combined with the music, has a hip feel that keeps you going. The lights are bright and the game makes you feel like you're in the future without forcing it down your throat. None of the missions overstay their welcome either. While you can't replay the same mission once you complete it to earn a better time, you'll still want to improve in the next mission.

The game's controls do deserve some special mention, you can control every single jump and movement you do. When you can control your movement in the air so precisely it gives a natural feel to the game. When you have that natural feel, you can easily get immersed in the game and feel like your flying through the air, if I had to compare this level of control to a game focused around running and hopping up and down buildings. I would call this a cross between Assassins Creed and Brink in terms of running.

Hover: Revolt Of Gamers
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 94%
Gameplay - 17/20
Graphics - 10/10
Sound - 10/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 96%
Violence - 10/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

The leveling system, while creative, is very boring. It's all stat upgrades mostly; even when you unlock the slot in your leveling grid that allows for a pet, all it does is float along side you and provide additional stat increases to your jumping or speed. The graffiti slot seems wasted when you want to change what you can spray paint on the walls. The leveling system is good when you want to create multiple characters for each team you create, and the leveling is quick and easy with how much there is to do in the world. However, a leveling system that only gives stats gives no life to your individual characters. The story is cute but it wears thin after awhile. The idea that you're some hip young rebels sticking it to The Man by having fun can be pretty corny. While I appreciate off the wall goofiness, it's a pretty boring story to pay attention to.

You'll have no moral problems with this game unless graffiti art really bothers you.

Hover: Revolt Of Gamers is a great goofy game that's worth your time. Even though the leveling system is boring and the story is really dumb, you can get lost for hours jumping from wall to wall. Show people how hardcore parkour is done in Hover: Revolt Of Gamers.

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Game Info:

Just Ignore Them
Developer: Stranga
Published by: GrabTheGames
Release Date: April 28, 2017
Available on: Windows
Genre: Adventure
Players: 1
ESRB Rating: Unrated
Price: $ 3.99

Thank you Stranga for sending us the review code.

The game we are going to talk about today is filled with pleasant and unpleasant surprises. The unpleasant surprises are actually a good thing though. Just Ignore Them is a game that I thought would be a C- at best but was much more. While the game is extremely dark and frightful, it is definitely not the game you should ignore. This is Just Ignore Them.

Just Ignore Them puts you in the role of Mark, a seemingly normal guy with a haunted past. One night as a child he lost it all. His mother was murdered in cold blood by the monsters he always saw as a child. While they seemed to be passive as his mother told him to just ignore them, one night he finds her lying in a pool of blood on her bed and his hell begins. You follow him to adulthood as he tries to live a normal life, though everywhere he goes these monsters and death are sure to follow. That is until he meets a girl named Brea at a run-down motel. With the keys in place Mark has a chance at a happy life - that is, if you can solve the mystery.

Just Ignore Them
Highlights:

Strong Points: This is a strong horror adventure, you will get spooked despite the low graphics.
Weak Points: The short game doesn't effect the story quality, yet it does effect the game's mechanics. Nothing feels completely fleshed out, it felt like the developer wanted to do more.
Moral Warnings: Despite the low graphics, this is a horrifying, violent, and suggestive story. It is not for young or innocent eyes.

The first thing I can say is this game kept me gripped tight. It reminded me of a horror game made in RPG Maker called The Witch's House. You don't think it will make you run for the hills, but the game scared many fans and streamers. So going into this game with a positive state of mind helped. The game is like something out of RPG Maker; all you do is walk around and select items, objects and people to get through the story. Other than combining items every now and then to keep the story moving, that's all you get. You don't have any battles or mini games to change things up. The story is all you will get with this game. Now the story won't win any Pulitzer prizes, yet I would watch a movie of it. Some people may think I am not a fan of story focused game's. That's the farthest from the truth, the story just has to catch me and not let me go. The characters might not be complex in this game, however, the games story carries the fun.

The game mechanic's, however, seemed to want to do more than the game's content allowed. You can combine items you pick up though the game only had me do that three times. The walking animation was slow and annoying to watch especially when you had to backtrack. The art style is cute and charming, but story focused games have to worry about breaking immersion.

Just Ignore Them
Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 80%
Gameplay - 13/20
Graphics - 9/10
Sound - 8/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls - 5/5

Morality Score - 28%
Violence - 4/10
Language - 3/10
Sexual Content - 5/10
Occult/Supernatural - 0/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 2/10

Every character in this title has the same face. When Mark and Brea look exactly the same it reminds you that this is an indie game on a budget. The game's length seems right for this story at two hours, but filling in more details might have been nice. It could have extended the game's exploration of mechanics as well. The developer is planning to at least add a content patch for Brea's story later. Yet it may just be the same game from a different point of view.

Without spoiling the story, it is a very brutal, adult story. While it doesn't show any nudity there is some implied sex between the main characters. You'll have a lot of foul language to deal with too. The only reason I am not giving the violence score a zero is because it is a very low graphic pixel game. The monsters that haunt Mark, named Jiwis, are made by trying to create life from the stolen life of others. While the game may have simple graphics, I would recommend this for players that are 18 and up.

While a brutal story, it is still a gripping horror and thriller. If you're willing to see a man truly haunted by evil and you want to help him find a small ray of sunshine, pick up Just Ignore Them.

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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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