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Game Info:

Fate of the Pharaoh
Released: August 31st, 2011
ESRB Rating: N/R
Available On: PC (Mac and IOS coming soon!)
Genre: Casual, Strategy
Modes: Single Player
Price: $6.99

Thank you GamersGate for sending us this game to review!

Egypt has fallen from its former glory and as the Pharaoh’s advisor; it’s your job to help your country and ruler.   If you do a good enough job, you may get some extra terrestrial help in building wonders and pyramids.  

When you first create your profile, you’ll have to select your difficulty setting.  If you don’t mind a time limit and like to earn achievements, choose the Adventure Mode.  Relaxed Mode lets you play at your own pace.  Unfortunately, your selection is final and you cannot change it without creating a new profile.  I went with the Adventure Mode.  I found that I was still able to progress to the next level after failing to beat Ra's time.  I went back and re-did the level to get a star next to it and I was able to earn a couple of achievements for beating several levels before Ra.  

The first few levels will teach you the basics on how to collect taxes, construct houses and clear the roads from creatures and debris in the way.  Everything has a price and you’ll be learning how to prioritize your needs in a jiffy.  There are only two resources that you need to gather: gold and building materials.  You get gold by collecting taxes from each house and the building materials are exchanged for gold at a quarry.  Wells are needed to provide your villagers with water and to keep them happy.  If they’re unhappy, they won’t pay taxes.  

Highlights:

Strong Points: A great casual game that is easy to grasp and yet offers some challenges.
Weak Points: This is not a hardcore strategy game and some may find it too easy.  
Moral Warnings: To progress in this game you must impress the aliens and please various gods and goddesses.   

Each level has objectives that must be met to unlock the next level.  The most common objective is to have a certain number of houses upgraded to a specified level.  By upgrading your houses, you’ll generate more tax revenue.  Upgrading your quarry makes the building materials cost less.    

 

As you get further in the game, you’ll encounter many new challenges such as your buildings falling apart.  The unit in disrepair will cease to function or provide revenue until it has been fixed.  I’m sure things get even harder, but I didn’t get too far into the game before I was convicted not to play it anymore.  

Before level fourteen, I saw some of my villagers worshiping their idols.  I had no control over it and wasn’t asked to participate, so I continued to play on.    When I reached level fourteen, the tables turned.  Instead of gathering materials and gold for my villagers, I had to gather these resources and give them as an offering to the goddess Maat to progress to the next level.  This is clearly a violation of the Ten Commandments.

Exd 20:2 I [am] the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage.  3 Thou shalt have no other gods before me.   4 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness [of anything] that [is] in heaven above, or that [is] in the earth beneath, or that [is] in the water under the earth:  5 Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God [am] a jealous God…

Score Breakdown:
Higher is better
(10/10 is perfect)

Game Score - 86%
Gameplay - 17/20
Graphics - 8/10
Sound - 8/10
Stability - 5/5
Controls 5/5

Morality Score - 75%
Violence - 7.5/10
Language - 10/10
Sexual Content - 10/10
Occult/Supernatural - 0/10
Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

Other than the god/goddess worship, Fate of the Pharaoh is a relatively clean game.  The only violence I saw was from defeating the scorpions, crocodiles, and snakes blocking the roads.  

It’s a real shame that I can’t recommend this game for Christians to play. Others will probably enjoy the colorful bright and colorful cartoon graphics, Egyptian themed music and the casual strategy game play.  The $7 price tags is reasonable, but please pray and think twice before buying it. 

People in this conversation

  • Guest - GenghisKhan44

    True, it's a violation of the first commandment not to have strange gods before God, to make idols to other gods and to worship them. But, please, take it in context. This was in ancient AEgypt, before Christianity had taken root in it. Religion was a very important part of AEgyptian society, just as it is for us today. But, historically, they were pagans, not Jews nor Christians. So historically this is correct, and I'd have it no other way.

    Though it does also raise a very important question: does God save people who have never heard the Gospel?

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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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