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Card

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Card Quest
    Developer: WinterSpring Games
    Published by: Black Shell Media
    Release Date: January 20, 2017
    Available on: Windows
    Genre: Collectible Card Game
    ESRB Rating: Unrated 
    Price: $7.99

    *Advertising disclosure* Though Black Shell Media is an advertising partner, this review is not influenced by that relationship.

    Thank you Black Shell Media for sending an Early Access review code.

    Card Games are a big thing for me. Before the boom that was Hearthstone I always loved card games yet had no one to play with. I hoped and hoped someone would make an online card game that would keep a high player base, yet poor service with overly expensive card packs usually turned me away. After Hearthstone, a revival in the idea of digital Trading Card Games happened. Hearthstone has a lot of promising competition - sadly Card Quest poses no threat to any card game right now.

    Card Quest is a single player TCG that allows you to play as a Rogue, Wizard or Warrior. You have a choice of a storyline to save a city from the undead or climbing a dwarven mountain to slay a dragon. Your skills come from the cards you play. They are separated into attack and defense cards. Each card has a special effect if you play cards back to back called chains. As you progress through each battle you move from room to room to a boss battle. As you level up your individual characters you gain more health and ability power. Leveling up and defeating bosses will also unlock new equipment. If you lose at any point in the game you will have to start from the beginning. Even if you defeat one boss and move to a new section of the story, you will start all the way at the beginning. 

    card quest
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: This game is a unique single player card game that may have a lot of replay value if the early access benefits the development.
    Weak Points: As the game is now it can be very dry and repetitive. The card art lacks the effort to make the cards feel special. The effects of the cards are cookie cutter TCG effects.
    Moral Warnings: Some pixel violence and some simple arcane themes yet not much to worry about.

    The biggest problem with this game is the influence of RNG. As a reminder this is a slang term that stands for random number generator. A lot of gamers use this term for things you can't control in your game. Your deck is dependent on the equipment your class picks so you won't have much in the way of strategic customization. The cards seem to revolve around control, rush or tempo decks. You can and will lose due to not getting the cards you need. This is why the perma death in this game can be a problem. Even if you get stronger, every game you lose to luck will make the repeated grind increasingly frustrating. As much as I wanted to enjoy the game for its unique angle I found it was very easy to get bored.

    Visuals on the enemies are fine yet the card art is rather boring. The cards are not memorable in any way, shape, or form. The actual effects of cards are pretty boring as well. Most card effects and chain effects either consist of generating resources, making the card cheaper to play or drawing more cards. Even though you travel to new locations you have only black backgrounds behind the enemies.

    cardquest
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 68%
    Gameplay - 10/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 7/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 92%
    Violence - 8/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 8/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Keep in mind this game is in a very early state. A lot might change and I do have hope for this title. Single player card games are harder to make than competitive games, and I would not want to see the developers give up. As of now they are very active on Steam community forums and do seem like they are ready to work hard to make this game a wonderful product. The soundtrack of the game is mediocre. It's not bad yet is nothing that will sell you on the game or turn you from it.

    You won't have many problems in the way of morality with this game. When you strike foes you'll see some pixelated blood. You'll also have some occult themes including raising the dead and using elemental magic but it doesn't seem to play a heavy focus in the game's story. I'd recommend this game for anyone over the age of 13.

    Card Quest may not pose any threats in any markets yet. However it seems the developers are not quite done on the quest of polishing this game. Good luck, WinterSpring Games.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Cherry Tree High Girls' Fight
    Developer: 773
    Published by: Sekai Project
    Release Date: June 13, 2016
    Available on: Windows
    Genre: Visual Novel, Card Game
    Players: 1
    ESRB Rating: Unrated
    Price: $ 12.99

    Thank you Sekai Project for sending us this game to review!

    People who know me think I have a bias towards anime games, but this is not true. A good game is a good game and a bad game is a bad game no matter how kawaii or “bouncy” things may get. People also think I am too soft on games with a lot of focus around luck. Today's game, Cherry Tree High Girls’ Fight, pushes the limits of luck tolerance to the most extreme level. The most credit I'll give the game is that it has a good game trying to get out. However the luck reliance got so bad it felt like I'd have a better chance getting amazing line hits on a slot machine.

    Cherry Tree High Girls’ Fight puts you in the role of a faceless gym coach who recently got a job at the elite academy Cherry Tree High. You are put in charge of forming a team for the Girls’ Fight, a mixed martial arts tournament to see which combatants are the best in Japan. Once you pick your three girls to form your team, you spend each week training, talking to, and taking care of them. Every Friday in the game is a match for the tournament. If you win enough matches you'll qualify for the finals, eventually reaching the final fight in the game.

    Cherry Tree High Girls' Fight
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: None Whatsoever, buy a better game.
    Weak Points: This game will give you the feeling of sitting at a slot machine in a casino. All luck, no skill. 
    Moral Warnings: Sexy outfits and perverted moments are in this game such as touching breasts for no reason or giving the girls a punch below the belt, also a strange reliance on  high school kids to fight demons. Some fighters use magical based attacks to win the tournament.

    When you name your coach you also have an option to pick between different perks for various bonuses. In the gym, you choose what stats to boost through various training exercises. You may teach your girls new attacks as well instead of boosting stats. If you choose, you can walk around the school to eavesdrop on conversations. This may give you various hints about the game or new conversation topics to have with your girls. You can talk to your girls to find out more about them. If they get injured you can choose to massage them in various places. If training goes poorly you can scold, encourage, or punch them in different places as well. Some of these actions cost Action Points or AP, you gain more the better you do in fights. During fights, every turn you draw five cards which can activate punch, kick, throw, grab, rush, ki, or special attacks. Each card has a number and each attack has a number next to it. The number on the card dictates advantage points, while the number next to the move indicates how difficult the move is to pull off. You can also choose to guard or evade as well with any card. You pick three different moves to do every turn and then the best attacks go through. You win by knocking out your opponent's three girls or by having higher combined HP than your foes at the end of twenty turns.

    So for quick reference I did manage to beat the game at least once on normal. Just because I beat it doesn't mean it must be easy to figure out. The game doesn't explain certain status ailments like downed. You are apparently better than your opponent if you see their cards on occasion, yet what determines that? Stats? Moveset? What determines what attacks are evading and which aren't? I would ask more questions yet that would feel like I am cheating my own paragraph. The only really clear thing about the game is what moves benefit from what stats. Through trial and error I was able to figure some of it out, yet it didn't feel satisfying. Sure a game doesn't need to hold your hand; challenge is always good. However the definition of challenge isn't black and white, you don't always want to be thrown headfirst without knowing whats going on. The tutorial and tip section in the game are rather bare bones. The company released a translated manual, yet that doesn't give you the depth of the game either. When figuring out a game feels like trying to solve the riddle to the Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull, it's just not fun. It's not true difficulty, it's trial and error figuring out a luck based game.

    This game prides itself as a strategic card game yet I don't see that. Sure you can prioritize what stats you get, but when you focus your character on strength based attacks, If you don't get your punch and kick cards then your other attacks will either be weak or you'll be forced to try and guard and evade. If you draw only level one or two punch cards and your opponent draws level 4 or 5 attacks, you won't get a single hit in and you'll just take punishment. I've checked every character's move set through repeated save files, and there is no move to upgrade the level of cards or draw extra cards. This is a common thing in other card games to mitigate luck yet this game is absent of such mechanics. In other non-card games with an element of luck, they always have a mechanic to mitigate and lessen the reliance on luck.

    Cherry Tree High Girls' Fight
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 50%
    Gameplay - 5/20
    Graphics - 5/10
    Sound - 5/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 64%
    Violence - 7/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 5/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 5/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 5/10

    Backgrounds are bare-bones and minimum, artstyle is ok yet it seems low effort compared to Sekai Project's other games. Even their visual novels have more movement. Animations are minimal and most of the time you're looking at still pictures. The music is generic and repetitive; at first I thought each girl had unique theme songs yet I quickly found out I was wrong. The story setup and payoff is the most generic thing ever: the tournament is a cover to train fighters to fight off some ancient Japanese flower demon with a dumb name. Does Fleurdermort sound like a credible threat or some weird cosplay original character? Also, while there may be scenes and even special unlocks with characters if you just talk to them, there do not seem to be any special benefits for doing so. Save your AP points for special training. The less you focus on your stats the more you set yourself up for failure.

    With morality, expect the usual perverted moments and scantily clad outfits with this game. No gym coach would need the option to massage his fighters breasts. Certain outfits in the game are intended for an erotic response. The boxer in a sports bra and gym shorts I can understand, that is the common outfit for most female boxers. A belly dancers outfit or a jungle girl in a thin and tight outfit that barely covers her body seems like its for the fan service. I am only going to knock the violence down one point because it's all text bubbles and flashing lights. I'll knock it down a bit more for giving the option to pull random sucker punches on your fighters. It's not only unethical, it's just bad coaching. Even if the story didn't impress me, it's still strange to rely on high school students to protect Japan from some flower demon. Some fighters use magical based attacks as well.

    If you're in an anime mood and you want to weeb out, you'll have superior anime style games to choose from. If you want a strategy game you'll have superior games to choose from. If you want a card game or game with an element of luck, you guessed it, you'll have superior games to choose from. This game fails in three categories and succeeds in none. The only positive out of this experience? Maybe I'll give a visual novel style game a try and see if I have fun with it.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Clash Royale
    Developed By: Supercell
    Published By: Supercell
    Released: January 4, 2016 (initially) March 2, 2016 (globally)
    Available On: Android, iOS
    Genre: PVP
    ESRB Rating: Not Rated
    Number of Players: 2
    Price: Free with in-app purchases

    Clash Royale is a spin-off game of the popular Clash of Clans.  The game has two players face off against each other by deploying different cards onto a small battlefield.  Clash Royale borrows a bunch of troops from Clash of Clans, while also having entirely original troops join the battlefield as well.

    When you download the game you are greeted by a trainer who explains the basic gameplay and how to deploy troops and such.  Eventually after getting through training the real battles begin.  Also after you finish training there are 5 different places you can go.  The 1st place is the shop area, the 2nd place is the cards zone, the 3rd place is where you can battle, the 4th place is where your clan is, and the 5th place is where challenges and tournaments are.

    The 1st place is the shop area.  This is a place where you can buy coins, gems, chests, and cards.  Gems are used to buy most chests in the shop and unlock them immediately, along with buying coins.  Gems are obtained from specific chests and can be bought with real money.  Coins are obtained from, as I mentioned before, gems, and can also be gained from donating cards and winning battles.  Chests are bought using either gems, coins, or real money if bought through a special pack.  Chests will give you coins and cards, and depending on the chest certain rarities of cards are guaranteed.  Three cards are placed in the shop for you to buy, changing daily (on Sunday you can buy six different cards).  Every so often you can get a special deal in the shop that will cost you coins, gems, or real money to obtain.  I normally don’t do much here unless there are cards I use that are being sold and I want to buy some.

    When you start up a battle you will be placed in an arena to battle another player in.  Both you and your opponent have three towers and your goal is to destroy more towers than your opponent.  There are two crown towers and one king tower.  If you destroy the king tower you automatically win.  You will also have a deck of cards to play as well.  Each card costs elixir and depending on how strong the card is, it will cost either more or less elixir.  For example if you had a card that deploys four pathetically weak skeletons, then it would only cost 1 elixir, while if you established a strong golem, then it would cost 8 elixir to place.  For this reason you have to strategize and work your deck to work in offense, defense, ground, and air.

    Clash Royale
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Extremely fun; nice variety of cards to use; stable connection in battles
    Weak Points: Can get very frustrating; chest unlock times are a bit long
    Moral Warnings: Cartoon violence; some cards deploy troops that use magic and other cards deploy spells

    Battles will last three minutes unless you either destroy the king tower early, or both you and your opponent destroy the same amount of towers, in which it will go to overtime and an extra minute is added to the clock.  If you win you will gain 1, 2, or 3 crowns (depending on how many towers you destroyed), a bunch of trophies, coins, and a chest.  If you lose then you will still gain the crowns, but you will lose trophies, and you won’t get any gold or chests.  There have been many times where I would lose a bunch of times and get extremely frustrated and upset about losing.  The reason being is that the amount of trophies you have will determine what arena you’re in, so if you gain more trophies you go to a higher arena, and if you lose trophies you will go to a lower arena.  Overall battles are extremely fun to play and is extremely well polished.  Also note that you are playing against another human player, not a computer.  The only time you play against a computer is when you’re battling against your trainer.

    When you reach level three you can join clans.  Clans are little group type things in which you can chat, donate/get cards, and friendly battle other members in the clan.  Sometimes friendly battles can gain a challenge for a limited time where some special thing happens to the battle.  Also friendly battles are done according to tournament rules (see below).  The cards you can donate are common and rare cards.  Every Sunday you can ask for Epic cards, but you cannot ask for legendary cards at all.  Also every Monday a clan chest starts and all your clan members team up to get the crowns needed to unlock the chest in a set amount of time.  There are ten tiers in the clan chest and the rewards get better for each tier you finish, eventually getting to the tenth tier.

    When you reach level eight you can join challenges and tournaments.  Challenges are pretty much the same as regular battles, but the rewards are different.  Each time you win, coins and cards will be added to the chest you will receive after the challenge ends.  You get the chest when you either win twelve times or you lose three times.  Just like friendly battles, you will be presented with the option to do a special challenge sometimes.  Also know that joining challenges does cost gems.  Ten gems are needed to join the Classic Challenge and a hundred are needed to join the Grand Challenge, with the latter having the better rewards.

    Tournaments work similarly, but there are a couple rules added to tournament battles and everyone battles to gain the top prize in the tournament.  The rules to the tournament battles are that your king tower is leveled down to nine.  The common, rare, etc. cards are also leveled to a specific level, regardless of whether you're over the level or under the level.  Tournaments take two hours to create and last for an hour.  After the tournament is over you're presented with a chest (if you won anything) and it will take three hours to unlock.

    Clash Royale
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 84%
    Gameplay - 18/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 6/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 89%
    Violence - 8/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 6.5/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Chests are items you can obtain using various methods, but the main method is through battles.  There are different types of chests, some rarer than others.  Most chests have a specific time to unlock, ranging from three hours to a full day.  Once unlocked you can open it and you will obtain a specific amount of cards.  There are also different rarities of the cards.  Common, rare, epic, and legendary: common cards are of course common and you will see them in every chest pretty much.  Rare cards are a little bit more rare but you will normally find one pretty often.  Epic cards are pretty rare to get and unless you have a very rare chest you won’t be getting very many if any from chests.  Legendary cards are extremely rare to get and you’ll be pretty lucky to snatch one of these cards.  The only purpose of the crowns you obtain from battle are for the crown and clan chests.   I like how this system works, but I have an issue as well.  The chest unlock times are pretty long and even trying to get a couple of common cards from a silver chest takes three hours, which can get annoying.

    The sound is this game is good for the most part.  The sound effects are very well done, but the music could be better.  The graphics were very well done and everything looked very clean and pretty.

    The game gets updated very often and will normally add a couple new cards per month.  They also release “balance” updates that balance out different cards so that they aren’t underpowered or overpowered.

    There are a couple moral things to look out for.  One thing is that there is a ton of cartoon violence.  Another thing is that many troops in the game use magic as their attacks.  For example a wizard attacks by generating fire from his hands and a witch can summon skeletons from the ground.  There are also direct spell cards you can play, examples including a rage bottle or a lightning spell.  Depending on the clan you join there can also be foul language, but there are plenty of Christian clans to join.

    Overall this game is very fun and addicting to play.  I can spend hours on it and not get bored.  There are also a couple voice clips that I found funny as well.  The only complaints I have is that chests take a little long to unlock and that it can be frustrating if you lose a bunch of times in a row.  This game can be either completely free or very expensive to play, depending on if you want to spend real money or not.  I'm one of those people who doesn't pay for in-game items.

    (This game is often updated and some things I talked about in the review may get outdated. This review was made before the anniversary update came out)

     

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Culdcept Revolt
    Developed by: Omiya Soft
    Published by: NIS America
    Release date: October 3, 2017
    Available on: 3DS
    Genre: Card, turn based strategy
    Number of players: Up to four locally or online
    ESRB Rating: Teen for fantasy violence, mild blood, suggestive themes
    Price: $39.99
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    Thank you NIS America for sending us this game to review!

    Culdcept originally released in 1997 on the Sega Saturn. It was later released on other platforms in Japan and the only Western release was on the PlayStation 2 in 2003. Culdcept Revolt is a fitting 20th anniversary release and it looks great on the 3DS.

    The story isn’t very remarkable, but it serves the purpose in teaching you the basics of how this board/card game works. Your male character whom you get to name is an amnesiac who is taken in by a rebel group call the “Free Bats.” As it turns out, magic users called culdcepts are being hunted down and they want to escape the walled city for their freedom/safety. There are many henchmen of the count who want to wipe out the remaining culdcepts before they can ever escape.

    In the beginning, you have to play the quest maps, but once you complete the tutorial levels, you’ll unlock the computer, local, and online battles. Up to four people can play and like many games, the more the merrier. Sadly, there are not many online matches to join, but at least you get a free card/gift for connecting online every day.

    Culdcept Revolt
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Fun board/card game hybrid
    Weak Points: Hard to find anyone to play against online; no way to speed up opponent’s turns; lots of DLC
    Moral Warnings: Fantasy violence and magic use; undead monsters; language (d*mmit); some creatures are lacking adequate clothing 

    The board game aspect reminds me a lot of Monopoly. To win the game you must accumulate a set amount of magic/money. Magic is earned by collecting tolls on your properties and by passing through gates and making laps around the game board. Properties have elemental values to them and the creatures you summon there have neutral or elemental affinities as well. It’s best to match creatures and properties with the same element. Having multiple properties causes a chain effect to make your offense even more powerful. When you first summon a creature, they will be fatigued until a lap is completed.

    When landing on an occupied property you can pay the toll or fight the creature guarding it. If the attacker wins, the territory will become theirs. If the attacker cannot afford to pay the toll, they will have to sell their properties until they can do so. Fighting is only possible if you have a creature in your hand. Along with creatures, your hand may consist of various power-ups that will increase the strength, health, or fighting order of your combatant. At the beginning of your turn, a card is drawn and you can only hold a maximum of six in your hand. Any extra cards will have to be discarded at the end of your turn.

    Besides power-up cards there are also strategic ones you can use. There are cards available that let you preemptively attack an enemy from anywhere on the map. Other cards let you alter the number of dice or total result of them for any player. These cards can come in handy by forcing people to land on your territory or to slow them down from reaching a gate.

    Culdcept Revolt
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 84%
    Gameplay - 16/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 70%
    Violence - 7/10
    Language - 7/10
    Sexual Content - 6/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 5/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    The cards in your book make or break your performance in-game. The starter books are nice, but eventually you’ll want to customize them with card packs you purchase in the shop with in-game money. The more expensive the card pack, the higher the chances of better cards inside of them. You can sell unwanted cards. The card books can be duplicated and customized to your heart’s content. The online DLC shop that uses real currency lets you customize the game further with various cosmetic changes for the book covers, dice, and so forth.

    As you progress in the story mode you’ll unlock various AI characters to play against. Some of them are rather formidable opponents. If your friends own a copy of the game you can play against them too if they are online or nearby.

    Before considering this game for yourself or your friends to play, take note of these moral issues within it. Like many fantasy games there are undead creatures and magic spells used. Some of the monsters are undead and all of them have to be summoned to protect their territories. Some of the creatures like the male Amazon have an aversion to clothing. There are some female characters can use more attire as well. Last but not least, there is some mild language (d*mn, d*mmit, hell) in the game.

    In the end, Culdcept Revolt is a solid strategy card/board game. It’s well polished on the 3DS and the background music and voice acting is well done on it. I’m not a fan of the paid DLC, but there is plenty of free DLC available as well. I hope that multiplayer grows for this title, but until then I’m having fun playing against the AI.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Elder Scrolls: Legends
    Developer: Dire Wolf Digital, Bethesda Softworks
    Published by: Bethesda Softworks
    Release Date: March 9, 2017
    Available on: Android, iOS, Microsoft Windows, MacOS
    Genre: collectible card game
    Players: 1-2
    ESRB Rating: Unrated
    Price: Free to play with card pack microtransactions.

    Whether you love the Elder Scrolls series or hate it, a lot of people didn't expect it to get a card game anytime soon. So Elder Scrolls: Legends isn't exactly being talked about in mainstream gaming media, yet it sees a steady feed of curious new players and it has a pretty well sized community. While I would be willing to bet Elder Scrolls: Legends' existence is due to the popularity of Hearthstone, it is rather foolish to say that Blizzard is the only one that should hold a card game. Let's see how Elder Scrolls stacks up.

    In Elder Scrolls: Legends you have a story mode that acts as your tutorial to teach you of the various mechanics in the game. Once you reach a certain point in the story mode you can either go play against other players, enter a solo or multiplayer Arena, continue the first story to earn more gold and cards or you can enter ranked mode against players. Arena is a draft mode in which you pick from sets of random cards until you have 30 cards. In the solo arena your AI opponents may have slightly different rules in each match. In a match, you have two lanes that can fit four cards each for a total of 8. Cards in the left lane usually have no additional effect. While cards in the right lane become “hidden” which means they can't be attacked by creatures on the turn they are summoned in the right lane. Every five HP you lose, you get a free card as marked by runes surrounding your HP bar. Some cards can even be played immediately if you get them this way; these are called prophecy cards. Keep in mind that once you get your free cards you cant heal up to get more free cards, Runes are a one and done sort of deal. First to reduce their opponent's HP to 0 wins.

    Elder Scrolls: Legends
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: The game definitely has a reasonable price range for new players. Out of all the competition this one has the best ease of access.
    Weak Points: This game has no strong unique point other than being based off the Elder Scrolls world. The community interaction is nearly non existent between the developers and the players.
    Moral Warnings: You have the usual magic to expect with these card games, arcane necromancy and firebolts.

    Graphics are ok; the board you play on is rather boring and the music doesn't have any real variation. The card art is ok and voice acting is lovely and it will surely please any Elder Scrolls fan. Each card is separated into different attribute colors such as strength, intelligence, agility, endurance, and willpower. You also have multi attribute cards and neutral cards to choose from. Any deck can have two different attributes, multi attribute cards that match the two main attributes you have in your deck and neutral cards. With no set class in Elder Scrolls you have the options to make many different deck variations compared to a class restricted game.

    Elder Scrolls doesn't have that unique point to really set itself apart from the competition. Sure, there are two card lanes, yet that isn't a extremely unique thing in gaming. While mana builds up on its on instead of having to play mana cards, Hearthstone already beat them to that. The foil cards are just cards with a shining gold border. As of right now I have no idea what the future of Elder Scrolls: Legends will be. Bethesda does not have the close contact with its community that some of its competitors do with this game. Just because they are busy with the Creation Club or Quake Champions doesn't mean they should just ignore what they started. Players are left in the dark on any potential for a tournament scene or future expansions.

    Elder Scrolls: Legends
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 74%
    Gameplay - 13/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 7/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 90%
    Violence - 9/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 6/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    As far as pricing goes, they offer multiple bundles as well as decent complete decks you can purchase for in game gold. On average forty packs will cost you $49.99 and the extra story expansion, The Dark Brotherhood, will cost you $20. You can also purchase event tickets for arena entrances or limited time events so you don't have to pay 150 in game gold. Event tickets can also come in a bundle for $6.99. As of right now I'd estimate I've played about 20 hours at least. During this time, from free packs and in game gold as well as arena runs purchased with both in game gold and free event tickets I have been able to build several decent decks. I have a decent amount of wins under my belt and I have yet to spend money on the game. The game also tells you how much of each set you own. As of now I own 50 percent of the classic set and 30 percent of the Skyrim expansion without spending a penny.

    A strange but generous thing they do every six hours is also give Twitch drops: by logging into twitch.tv with your Bethesda account, you can randomly get 600 in game gold added to your Elder Scrolls: Legends account. This makes it easier to get into the game without spending money.

    On morality, with the Elder Scrolls series of games you expect a lot of witchcraft and magic so that's no different with this card game. Other than that though there is no gore or violence to really worry about.

    While this game was definitely unexpected it is not without its merit. It is a well put together game with a team that has a great depth of knowledge in how to make a card game. Nothing wrong with playing more than one card game.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Eternal
    Developed by: Dire Wolf Digital
    Published by: Dire Wolf Digital
    Release Date: Nov 18, 2016
    Available on: Windows, macOS
    Genre: Collectible Card Game
    ESRB: Not rated
    Price: Free with in-app purchases

    When talking about digital collectible card games (CCG) you have to tackle them a bit differently from reviewing other video games. Sound, art and UI all play important roles in the enjoyment of the game but there are two things that must be discussed first; the mechanics of the game and how much money you will most likely spend if you want to get into its competitive scene. Competition is the name of the game with any card game, I will also talk about the gambling aspects of digital CCGs with Eternal on Steam. (Please note that Eternal is listed as Eternal card game on Steam due to several other digital CCG's with the word Eternal in its name.)

    Eternal, by Dire Wolf Digital, is a Magic the Gathering like game which pits players against one another in one on one battles. You fight against your opponent by casting spells, summoning creatures, defending and attacking until one player's health reaches zero. Instead of the class based system in other CCGs such as Hearthstone, you have different themed mana cards you can play to use your cards. This allows players to mix and match factions to their liking. 

    Eternal
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Challenging game with plenty to love for serious CCG fans, great art, easy to be a free to play player.
    Weak Points:  You will lose to what MTG fans know as “Mana screw/flood.” Sound could use a little more effort. 
    Moral Warnings: There will be a strong temptation to spend money on card packs just for that one card you really really want; some cards include demons and scantily clad women.

     There is a campaign mode to teach you the ins and outs of each color of mana and once you're finished with each story you unlock a deck of the corresponding color. You also have Gauntlet, a series of games against AI opponents for better prizes. Forge is similar where you pick from a pool of random cards to face a group of AI opponents for prizes. Against other players you have the option of a ranked constructed mode where you build your own deck out of your collected cards to face one another or a draft mode where you take turns with people in picking cards to face off against one another. 

    The game has no voice acting to the cards and the song that plays is the same tune throughout each match, but that may change once the game's out of early access. The art style is pleasing to look at and it helps in making the cards seem more real. The challenge and the strategy are there for any hardcore CCG fan and this game is definitely something that takes a lot of getting used to. The game will teach you and you can learn how to build a deck on your own rather easily. However you will have to deal with strategies used by top players. This also means that people with big collections will look up the decks used by the top players; this is known as net decking. For those that hate Magic The Gathering style mana you can lose games due to “mana screw/flood”. This term refers to when you draw too many creature or spell cards without mana to cast them or you draw all your mana cards without getting enough creatures. You will have to build your deck around drawing mana and solid strategies. Not every strategy will be viable in the game. 

    Eternal
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 82%
    Gameplay - 18/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 5/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 90%
    Violence - 8/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 7/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Let's talk morality. Some of the cards can include demons or women that are sexually suggestive. However, gambling urges are a very real thing in this game and depending on how you feel about it, this may affect your decision to play this game. After playing only 17 hours I have managed to obtain a sizable collection of cards without spending a penny. Any card you draft in the Forge or draft modes you end up keeping in your collection for free and grinding for in game currency is not difficult at all. Also as the game is now you cannot lose your cards to other players. However the temptation to spend money to buy card packs just to get that one card you want will be there. So those who despise the temptation of gambling beware. 

    This is a solid and deep card game with plenty for hardcore fans to enjoy. While luck will tempt you to spend money for cards, you can build a collection for free. 

     

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Hand of Fate 2
    Developer: Defiant Development
    Published by: Defiant Development
    Release Date: November 7, 2017
    Available on: Windows, Playstation 4, Xbox One, macOS, Linux
    Genre: Action, RPG, Card Game
    Players: 1
    ESRB Rating: Violence, Blood
    Price: $29.99

    Hand of Fate was quite the fun and challenging indie gem of a few years back. It had everything from adventure, an intriguing story that let your imagination run wild, and the sassiest card dealer I have ever seen. While the combat was very basic and the graphics were on the simple side it's a game I can gladly recommend to anyone at full price. Let's see how the sequel stacks up in Hand of Fate 2.

    In Hand of Fate 2 once you customize your character you'll find yourself traveling with the mysterious dealer from the previous game. This time he isn't completely out to get you and lets you know that the world's problems are due to someone else taking over his game. He has made an updated version so you may be ready to take vengeance for him. While you play his game you learn just what's going on in the outside world through the new cards he has made for you.

    Before you pick any level in the game you must build a deck just like the previous game. You now have one companion you can take with you in each level. There are a preset number of event cards you're allowed to take in each stage, as well as equipment and supplies you can start with. Now we have card rarities to consider as well. New platinum cards are valuable events or items that can really save you from a dire situation if luck swings in your favor. Crimson cards are very dangerous events or items that can make your game end very quickly. However, with skill you might just be able to use them to destroy any challenge in your way. After you set up your deck, the dealer will add in more cards of his own depending on what level you've chosen. Just like the last game, some cards will be marked with tokens of various colors; by completing the event or challenges on the card you will unlock more cards to use in future levels. Some weapons have these tokens now to unlock new weapons; the challenges can involve things like defeating certain factions of enemies a certain amount of times or deflecting attacks and performing a riposte.

    Hand of Fate 2
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Overall stronger than the original. New ways for lady luck to trip you over are fun, even if they might not swing in your favor.
    Weak Points: The cards are not as well designed as the previous game. Some cards seem redundant or are just a detriment to use when compared to other cards. Combat loading in and out is kind of slow.
    Moral Warnings: Light violence and magical symbolism.

    Your character is represented as a small gold game piece to move across each face down card like it's a board game. As you move along, each card will play out its event with text and then you make whatever choice you feel is right. Sometimes the spaces are just for shops or trading equipment, yet some could have you risking a deal with a den of thieves or hoping a group of goblins is kind enough to give you food. Each step on the table will cost one food; as you consume a piece of food you get a small heal, but if you have no food you lose health. You have gold to purchase items and now you also have fame to worry about. Certain equipment or events will require different amounts of fame to be used. Some events will require you to play a particular mini game to determine success or failure on your choices. You have the return of the classic success or failure cards in which you choose one face down card to determine what happens. You now have dice events and events based on a spin of a wheel as well. Some events have a skill based mini game in which you must stop a pendulum of light from swinging on a certain space. If you land on a gold or silver part of the pendulum you succeed, anywhere else and you fail. Once you beat the final challenge of a level, you unlock more cards and levels.

    Combat in the game is still very simple and straightforward. You string together attacks and you can block attacks from foes if they have a green mark when they are attacking; red attacks are unblockable and must be dodged. The game has various trinkets you can equip for limited use if you find them on the board. Aside from a sword and shield option you can also find hammers, axes and dual wield weapons. Be aware some attacks can only be blocked with a shield. Keep in mind you can wear as many rings as you desire and you do not have an inventory limit in how many weapons and pieces of armor you can carry with no need to equip them.

    So the game does improve on the original but it's not without its own flaws or annoyances. Let's talk about the good first. The combat does feel more fluid and heavy than the original. While the combat wasn't bad in the first game you felt like you and your enemies were moving through air with no solid ground to walk on. I am glad that there are more mini games to determine success or failure than just the success and failure chance cards. The events are fun and the story is rather intriguing as well. I am excited to see all the events I can get by playing the game. Unlocking the card's have the same feeling of opening collectible cards, you don't even have to pay for card packs. The enemy variation is decent, each faction has its own backstory and it really adds to the immersion of the story.

    Hand of Fate 2
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 86%
    Gameplay - 18/20
    Graphics - 9/10
    Sound - 7/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 76%
    Violence - 6/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 5/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7/10

    The equipment that I've found so far in the game isn't very fun. Most of the armor I've found either increases gains of gold and food or it gives you a little extra luck on the mini games. Most of the weapons I've found just do extra damage to certain factions of enemies. When you're being teleported to a combat section of the game the loading time seems a bit longer than the last game; it doesn't flow naturally at all and it takes awhile to get in and out of battle. Some of the levels, such as the strength level, seem to be a little too luck reliant, even for me. In order to get the extra token at the end when you defeat the ogre you have to have at least 60 defense by the time you get to the end. I've had to redo this multiple times due to failed dice rolls when I had a chance at retrieving equipment from enemies. Sure the dealer can tell me I can try a new level to unlock new cards to help me. It doesn't help if I still don't get the cards that I unlocked during an event. I still love games with a bit of luck, but if you're not patient with luck based challenges you might not have as much fun as I did. My last complaint is that some of the cards seem redundant. The Lady of the Lake for example gives you a free weapon, but the Elder's gift gives you a free platinum weapon.

    The graphics are decent to look at and I haven't had any stutters or issues except on loading in and out of battle. The soundtrack is OK but it can get repetitive after awhile. Controls are fluid just like the first game.

    So like the first game there's a lot of magic symbolism such as the gypsy cart of the dealer or alchemist and occult styled events. This includes monstrous creatures. The game is violent yet even the dealer encourages you to find other ways around combat this time. The game has minimal blood effects. I had to zoom in to even notice them on a finishing blow.

    Hand of Fate 2 is an improvement on an already fantastic game and I can recommend both to people. It has a lot of replay value and an endless mode is going to be coming in a update to the game soon. Just remember that sometimes a bit of luck can either put a golden hammer in your hands or you can go from 100 hp to 10 in the blink of an eye.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Janken Cards
    Developed by: GKT Studios Entertainment
    Published by: GKT Studios Entertainment
    Released: October 17, 2016
    Available on: Windows, Mac
    Genre: Card game
    ESRB rating: E
    Number of players: 1-8 
    Price: $4.99

    Thank you, GKT Studios Entertainment, for sending us a copy of this game to review!

    One of the most widely-known games in the world is rock-paper-scissors. In fact, it is believed that the game originated in China in the 17th Century, and is largely unchanged from that early model. Although we know it as "rock-paper-scissors," its Chinese name is "Jan-ken."

    Now in 2016, a company called GKT Studios Entertainment has created their own version. Janken Cards uses the same basic premise of the ancient, popular game, but adds its own twist. 

    The video game has two players facing each other, sharing a deck of cards. Between them is a tableau of five columns, each divided into six rows. Each player has a hand of three cards, most of them which bear the familiar symbols of rock, paper or scissors. On his or her turn, the player chooses a card and places it in one of the columns. If the card "defeats" the one it rests upon – for example, if you play a rock on a scissors card – then the earlier card is discarded and that player scores points. If the card doesn't defeat it, then it simply adds to the column. Filling the column with alike cards will count as a column "won" by that player. However, playing the final card on a column with mismatched suits – or removing the last card of a column and exposing the "bomb" card at the top – will give the column to the player's opponent, instead. The game is won by a player either capturing three columns or, if the deck runs out of cards, by having more points than the opponent.

    Janken Cards
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Interesting variation on rock-paper-scissors; cute avatars
    Weak Points: Dull music and sound effects; simplistic AI; numerous typos and bugs
    Moral Warnings: Minor language issues

    The rock, paper and scissors cards aren't the only ones in the deck. Other cards can be found that do different things, such as hide all the cards on the tableau for a turn, or double the amount of points a player gets that time. These extra action cards add an additional dimension to the game, and clever manipulation can lead to some impressive combos.

    Even though there is quite a bit of randomness to the game, there is quite a bit of strategy involved as well. The players need to carefully place their cards in order to keep an edge. Sometimes, if a column is going to be lost, it helps to go ahead and score the points from it anyway. Although the game does seem a bit complicated at first, it gets familiar after a few games, and players can form a coherent strategy to start winning on a fairly consistent basis. Once a good strategy is discovered, though, the computer opponent becomes a bit of a pushover. The AI doesn't typically make mistakes, but I've found that most of the games I lost was due to my own bungling, rather than the skill of the computer. After you begin winning consistently, the game starts to grow dull.

    There are three game modes to play: a "quick mode" where you play against a single opponent; an "adventure" mode, which consists of eight games against different opponents, with different decks each time (as well as a greatly reduced turn timer for the last matches – better choose your play quickly!); and a "tournament" mode, where eight players can compete in a single-elimination bracket in order to determine who will be the Janken champion. The "quick" mode allows for two players, while the "tournament" mode permits up to eight. There is no on-line gameplay, and local play is determined through a "hotseat" format. Both players can use the same controller or keyboard to play.

    Despite its strengths, the game does suffer from quite a few bugs. For example, in some places the "continue" button is so large that it obscures portions of the game screen. I was awarded Steam achievements that I actually didn't accomplish (like winning adventure mode). The game also is riddled with typos, such as "loosing" a life in Adventure mode or, in the achievements, winning one when you score "10'000" points. Hopefully these will be addressed in future patches.

    Janken Cards
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 62%
    Gameplay - 10/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 6/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 3/5

    Morality Score - 92%
    Violence - 10/10
    Language - 8/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 8/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    The graphics in the game are cartoonish, but stiff. The characters have a few panels of idle animations, as well as win and lose poses, but otherwise are simple still pictures. The backgrounds change and the cards move nicely, but the avatars themselves are stiff.

    The controls in the game are a little strange, though. I was surprised to find that there is no mouse support. You have to use the arrow keys to navigate through the menus or choose where to play the cards. Selections can be done with the space bar or the enter key. The game wouldn't even acknowledge my Logitech controller, and would only pay attention to my Xbox controller after I specifically instructed it to through the "Options" menu. The second controller worked all right, but it is not possible to customize the keys to your liking.

    The music in the game is entirely forgettable and repetitious. At least it isn't annoying. Some of the sound effects can get a bit tedious, though. There are a few voices, but not many – the tutorial isn't voice-acted. Speaking of tutorials, the interactive tutorial isn't terribly helpful. I actually learned more reading through the instruction manual than trying to go through the tutorial.

    If you're concerned about any morality issues, you'll find this one to be as safe as they come. One of the decks of cards feature monstrous hands and is referred to as "Helloween," but that was the only language issue to be found. Also, one of the avatars is a green-skinned vampire, but that would be the only undead reference I spotted.

    There is potential to this game, and it is certainly an interesting twist to the familiar rock-paper-scissors. But the bugs and typos make it difficult to recommend Janken Cards to others. There is some amusement to be found here, but not a lot. Those who strive to get the 50 hour achievement are probably more patient than I am, because after playing for just two, I felt like playing a different game. Maybe with real cards, instead.

     

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Solar Echoes 
    Developed by: Corefun Studios LLC
    Release Date: August 25, 2012
    Genre: Sci-Fi RPG
    Price: $25.00 for the rulebook
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    *Advertising disclosure* Though Corefun Studios is a current advertising partner, this review is not influenced by that relationship.

    Thank you Corefun Studios for providing us with digital copies of the player’s guide and Operation: Flash Strike.

    Solar Echoes takes place in a sci-fi universe where seven alien races are struggling to co-exist peacefully. There is an alliance in place and it’s enforced by the elite agents from the Union Guard. Those who are familiar with the Shadowrun series may recognize some similarities, but in this game you’re fighting as lawful aliens. Like many tabletop games, you’ll be relying on dice rolls for determining how much damage armor absorbs and the effectiveness of your attacks on the enemies. Each player will need four 6-sided dice that will decide the fate of the universe.

    The 15-chapter player guide is 214 pages and covers the specifics on gameplay, the races, vehicles, combat, social interactions, weapon information, and more. I made the mistake of pricing out the cost of printing this guide out and decided that $28 for a black and white copy is a bit too much. Physical editions can be found on Amazon for cheaper than the digital only copy.

    Solar Echoes
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Fast paced combat system; fun weapons and mission sequences that can include hacking and car chases
    Weak Points: Like many tabletop games, expect a bit of a learning curve
    Moral Warnings: Alien races, combat violence

    If you’d like to take this game for a test drive before buying the player’s guide, you can download the learn to play mission, Operation: Flash Strike, for free. This mission is quite fun and comes with almost everything you need to get a good tabletop session going. You just need to provide some players, dice, and some placeholders for enemy units and vehicles. For our game, I borrowed some Hotwheels cars and army men from my son.

    Operation: Flash Strike is 46 pages and I printed them out using my color laser printer. It comes bundled with pre-made characters, foldable player icons/pieces, game board segments, phase cards, and character sheets for making your own characters. Each character has a different skillset and loadout that comes in handy for this mission. Only a couple of characters have hacking or persuasion skills while others are only good for smashing criminals to a pulp. Teamwork is encouraged and the battle system is fast paced and lets everyone jump into the action without needing to roll for initiative.

    Solar Echoes

    Combat is broken down into four phases: Movement, Action, Reaction, and Resolution. Characters can move freely until an enemy enters the scene. Once an opponent is in sight, the movement phase begins and each character's movement points are restricted. Sprinting allows for double movement at the cost of stamina points. The action phase is where attack types and targets are declared by the player and mission controller (MC). In the reaction phase a player can attempt to dodge an attack and use the side step ability if their character has it available. The side step ability leaves the character standing while other evasive maneuvers leave them in a prone state that requires getting up instead of moving in the next round. The final resolution phase is where all of the attacks and dodges take place in any order since everything happens simultaneously in this game.

    Besides battles, you may run into hacking scenarios and intense car chases. Everyone seemed to enjoy the Operation: Flash Strike mission. I played as the MC and found the tips and examples helpful. Some of the players asked some questions that were answered in the player’s guide so I was glad to have that on hand.

    Overall, Solar Echoes is quite fun and well thought out. Even my kids with short attention spans stayed in character and played through the end of the mission (which was successful). If you’re looking for a sci-fi pen and paper RPG with cool weapons and no magic, then look no further!

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Uno
    Developed by: Ubisoft
    Published by: Ubisoft
    Release Date: August 16, 2016
    Available on: PC, PS4, Xbox One
    Genre: Card game
    Number of players: up to four online, two locally
    ESRB Rating: Everyone
    Price: $9.99

    Thank you Ubisoft for sending us this game to review!

    Uno was developed in 1971 and was branded by Mattel in 1992.  It’s very similar to the card game Crazy Eights where you have to match together cards with the same numerical value.  The Uno deck has four colors that range from zero to nine.  The players have to put down a card of the same color or face value of the current card in play.  If the player cannot meet either of those two requirements, they can change the color with a change color card in their possession or draw a card. The number of cards drawn in a turn depends on the game rules in play.

    In this game you can play with the default rules or tweak them with some pre-set options.  The default draw rule is to only draw one card if you cannot make a move.  This rule can be changed to keep drawing cards until a playable one is received.  Ubi Club is implemented in this title and with points you can unlock the Jump In rule that lets you play an identical card (color and number) if you’re fast enough to press the randomly picked button on the controller within two seconds.   

    Another optional game rule is to allow hand swapping when a seven or a zero card is played.  The seven card lets you specify which deck to trade with and the zero card rotates everyone’s decks clockwise.  If you want to spice up the game even further, the Rabbids Uno deck adds a couple more cards and a bit of chaos into the mix.  

    Uno
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: A fun way to play a timeless card game
    Weak Points: Frequent disconnects during online play; second controller is a pain to setup
    Moral Warnings: You never know how people online may talk or look with video chat enabled

    Since the origin of the game, Uno has tested friendships with the Draw Two and Draw Four cards.  You can now strain relationships even further by stacking the Draw cards and stick it to the person who can’t supply a stackable card.  With the video chat and microphone support you may get some foul language out of the players you’re up against. 

    Locally you can play alongside another player and can see each other’s hands.  Getting the second controller to work on the Xbox One took some tweaking.  In order to be recognized the second controller has to be assigned to another Microsoft account (or as a guest) before the game is launched.  Online you can play against four people and if anyone drops out during the game they’ll be replaced with AI players.  One of the games I was playing ended prematurely after all of the online players dropped out throughout the game.

    Uno
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 80%
    Gameplay - 18/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 7/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 4/5

    Morality Score - 100%
    Violence - 10/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Finding players online only took a few seconds as of this review.  If online play isn’t an option, the AI players will provide enough of a challenge.  The winning conditions can be set to one round, 200, 300, or 500 points.  It should come as no surprise that the AI is faster than human players even though the game automatically selects your next playable card if you have one available.  There is the option to call the bluff of needlessly playing Draw cards, but I haven’t been successful with doing so against the AI.  Perhaps it’s easier with human players.  If you’re wrong in calling out the bluff, you’ll get 50% more cards than originally assigned to you.

    Graphically the standard deck looks as it should with no added bells or whistles.  If you want animations and more chaos, the Rabbids deck will have you covered. On the music front, the background music is smooth jazz which is serviceable, but not my first choice.

    Overall, Uno is a great and family friendly addition to your console or PC library.  There are plenty of people to play against and it’s perfectly playable offline too.  As with any online interaction, your mileage may vary on the vocabulary of your opponents.  

  •  

    Thank you Utter Nonsense LLC for sending us this game and a holiday sampler pack to review!

    Utter Nonense is available in two flavors: the Family Edition, which is recommended for ages eight and up and the Naughty Edition which is recommended for ages eighteen and up. Judging by the Amazon reviews, the Naughty edition has been out longer. This review is based on the family edition.

    Utter Nonsense

    This base game sells for less than $25 and includes five hundred cards which are divided into phrases and accents. Each player is given seven silly phrase cards. The judge of the round announces the accent in which a phrase of the player’s choosing should be read. The first judge is selected by who has the stinkiest feet. After the first round, the winner of the previous one becomes the judge. The winner keeps the accent card and whomever accumulates five accent cards wins the game.

    Some typical accents like French, Italian, cowboy, pirate, and Southern drawl are a given. Some of the more unique ones include pooping, rapping, Arnold Schwarzenegger, nerd, and Donald Trump. Chewbacca was one of the harder ones for us to pull off. Some of the cards let the judge choose a movie character or animal to base the accent off of.

    Utter nonsense

    Naturally, some phrases go better with certain accents than others. The key to winning a round is to have a fitting pair. For example “M-I-S-S-I-S-S-I-peed my pants” would be good with the baby accent or using a valley girl voice to say the phrase “A picture is worth a thousand likes.”

    My family laughed a lot while playing multiple rounds of this game. The kids really had a lot of fun with it as well. If you’re looking for a fun new card game, be sure to check out Utter Nonsense.


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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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